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What protocol does Ping uses TCP or UDP

Posted on 2010-11-14
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What protocol does Ping uses.
Is it TCP or UDP ?
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Question by:SrikantRajeev
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by:prhowe
ID: 34133452
Neither really.  Ping uses Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP).

This explains it rather well.
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by:prhowe
ID: 34133454
http://www.experts-exchange.com/expertsZone.jsp

the link didn't come across, sorry..

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by:SrikantRajeev
ID: 34133460
U mean ICMP does not use either of TCP or UDP
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by:mccarl
ID: 34133524
> U mean ICMP does not use either of TCP or UDP

No it doesn't. ICMP (ping), TCP and UDP are all protocols that layer on top of IP but are independent of each other.
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by:SrikantRajeev
ID: 34133627
so is ICMP connection oriented protocol or connection less
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by:mccarl
ID: 34133684
You wouldn't really call it either but it would be closer to a connection-less protocol like UDP. But it isn't used to carry data as such, it is used to report a condition (possibly an error condition). Check out ICMP on wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Control_Message_Protocol
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by:profgeek
ID: 34135873
ICMP runs alongside IP on the network layer, whereas UDP and TCP are stacked on top of IP on the transport layer.

See the following reference (an excellent site for referencing all protocols):

http://www.protocols.com/pbook/tcpip1.htm

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mccarl earned 500 total points
ID: 34136014
> ICMP runs alongside IP on the network layer

I understand that ICMP may be implemented in the network layer, but it still relies upon IP (ie. stacked on top of) just the same as TCP and UDP are.

The IP header has a field called 'Protocol' that specifies ICMP (1), TCP (6) or UDP (17) among others and the IP payload then contains a header for either ICMP, TCP or UDP, etc. Hence why it is technically stacked on top of IP even though practically it would be implemented alongside IP.
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by:SrikantRajeev
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Thanks
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