Is my CREATE TABLE syntax wrong?

Is there a problem with my SQL syntax here, problem is pointing to the Double entry for some reason. I am using MySQL and HeidiSQL to create the table.

CREATE TABLE `wind_data` (
      `ID` INT(10) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
      `DATE` DATE NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `TIME` TIME NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `DAT1` CHAR(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `WD` INT(3) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `WS` DOUBLE(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `DAT2` CHAR(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `DAT3` CHAR(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `DAT4` CHAR(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      PRIMARY KEY (`ID`)
)
ENGINE=InnoDB
ROW_FORMAT=DEFAULT
bhessionAsked:
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dsmileConnect With a Mentor Commented:
DO NOT specify length for DOUBLE datatype

CREATE TABLE `wind_data` (
      `ID` INT(10) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
      `DATE` DATE NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `TIME` TIME NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `DAT1` CHAR(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `WD` INT(3) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `WS` DOUBLE NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `DAT2` CHAR(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `DAT3` CHAR(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `DAT4` CHAR(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      PRIMARY KEY (`ID`)
)
ENGINE=InnoDB
ROW_FORMAT=DEFAULT
0
 
sunny-sConnect With a Mentor Commented:
try DOUBLE PRECISION instead of simple DOUBLE, maybe it would help.
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dsmileCommented:
Or you have to specify the number of digits after decimal point also

Try this

CREATE TABLE `wind_data` (
      `ID` INT(10) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
      `DATE` DATE NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `TIME` TIME NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `DAT1` CHAR(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `WD` INT(3) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `WS` DOUBLE(10,2) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `DAT2` CHAR(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `DAT3` CHAR(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      `DAT4` CHAR(10) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
      PRIMARY KEY (`ID`)
)
ENGINE=InnoDB
ROW_FORMAT=DEFAULT
0
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max-hbConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Hi!
Defining double type columns requires you to specify a format "x,y" where y is the precision after decimal separator:
CREATE TABLE `test`.`wind_data` (
`ID` INT( 10 ) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ,
`DATE` DATE NULL DEFAULT NULL ,
`TIME` TIME NULL DEFAULT NULL ,
`DAT1` CHAR( 10 ) NULL DEFAULT NULL ,
`WD` INT( 3 ) NULL DEFAULT NULL ,
`WS` DOUBLE( 10, 2 ) NULL DEFAULT NULL ,
`DAT2` CHAR( 10 ) NULL DEFAULT NULL ,
`DAT3` CHAR( 10 ) NULL DEFAULT NULL ,
`DAT4` CHAR( 10 ) NULL DEFAULT NULL ,
PRIMARY KEY ( `ID` )
) ENGINE = MYISAM ;

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sunny-sCommented:
also, note the MySQL needs two parameters after the word DOUBLE, or none, not one like you specified.

MySQL permits a nonstandard syntax: FLOAT(M,D) or REAL(M,D) or DOUBLE PRECISION(M,D). Here, “(M,D)” means than values can be stored with up to M digits in total, of which D digits may be after the decimal point. For example, a column defined as FLOAT(7,4) will look like -999.9999 when displayed. MySQL performs rounding when storing values, so if you insert 999.00009 into a FLOAT(7,4) column, the approximate result is 999.0001.
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bhessionAuthor Commented:
Great answering guys, you predicted my follow up questions as well.
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