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expanding C drive in VMware

Posted on 2010-11-15
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
I am running RHLinux for a VM on my vmware. the c drive is running out of disk space. Can someone please show me if i can expand the C drive. THanks in advance.
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Question by:locster73
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by:Darius Ghassem
ID: 34137175
You can expand the drive but I don't know if you can expand the partition within Red Hat. For an example, for a Windows machine within VM you can expand your C: drive but the expanded space would be unallocated space the expanded space does not add space to your current Windows Partition since this is not managed by VMware but instead the OS.
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by:avilov
avilov earned 100 total points
ID: 34137314
you can expand the drive. That is actually two step process

1. increase drive size for that VM under "Virtual Machine Properties"
2. In Red hat change volume size. That will require unmounting that drive. and since that appears to be your boot drive and a root partition, you'll have to boot from external media to do that.
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by:locster73
ID: 34137333
Avilov can you show me how i can do the second step in details. thanks
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by:poison5151
poison5151 earned 400 total points
ID: 34137354
Please post the output of fdisk -l.
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by:avilov
ID: 34137492
if you run LVM, you need to  extend logical volume with "lvextend" command

check filesystem first with "e2fsck" command,
and than run "Resize2fs"

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by:poison5151
ID: 34137529
avilov, he'll need to resize the physical partition and then the physical volume first, then resize the desired logical volume, and only then resize the filesystem. None of these steps require a reboot, let alone booting from external media.
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by:avilov
ID: 34137639
i didn't say reboot, i said umount  and if that is a  root partition he'll need to boot from external media. if that is incorrect please provide an instruction on how to unmount running root partition on live server
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poison5151 earned 400 total points
ID: 34144933
resize2fs can grow a mounted filesystem =). The process would be:

1. Resize partition with fdisk.
2. partprobe
3. pvresize
4. lvresize
5. resize2fs

I even tried it on my system:

Filesystem at /dev/vg/lv is mounted on /tmp/mount; on-line resizing required
Performing an on-line resize of /dev/vg/lv to 479232 (1k) blocks.
The filesystem on /dev/vg/lv is now 479232 blocks long.

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But the point seems moot since the original poster is MIA.
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