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Determining if ObjectStateManager has dirty records

Posted on 2010-11-17
3
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
I would like a sanity check.

Here is a static method I wrote to determine if the .Net Framework Entity's ObjectStateManager has any dirty records. (This code would be used to determine the state of the Save button, namely, count>0 means enabled else disabled.)

Is there no easier way to do this? Does ObjectStateManager not have any kind of a property to flag whether its contents are dirty?
static public int ChangedCount(this ObjectStateManager manager)
    {
        int changedCount = 0;
        try
        {
            changedCount += manager.GetObjectStateEntries(EntityState.Added).Count<ObjectStateEntry>();
        }
        catch {}

        try
        {
            changedCount += manager.GetObjectStateEntries(EntityState.Deleted).Count<ObjectStateEntry>();
         }
         catch { }
         
         try
         {
            changedCount += manager.GetObjectStateEntries(EntityState.Modified).Count<ObjectStateEntry>();
         }
         catch { }
            
         return changedCount;
    }

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Question by:esc_toe_account
3 Comments
 
LVL 52

Accepted Solution

by:
Carl Tawn earned 125 total points
ID: 34160052
You might be able to simplify it to (untested mind you):
static public int ChangedCount(this ObjectStateManager manager)
    {
        int changedCount = 0;
        try
        {
            changedCount += manager.GetObjectStateEntries(EntityState.Added | EntityState.Deleted | EntityState.Modified).Count<ObjectStateEntry>();
        }
        catch {}
            
         return changedCount;
    }

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Author Comment

by:esc_toe_account
ID: 34160127
This does simplify it. Plus it is now 3 times faster (if there is no dirt).

I guess one line of code is not bad but I would still like to hear whether there is a property in the manager that simply says dirty or not.
0
 
LVL 96

Assisted Solution

by:Bob Learned
Bob Learned earned 125 total points
ID: 34161222
If there is a property, I haven't found it yet.  All roads point to "ObjectContext.ObjectStateManager.GetObjectStateEntries".
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