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Microsoft Exchange 2010 CAL Vs Volume License

Posted on 2010-11-17
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
Hello,

Is there any difference between Microsoft CAL Vs Microsoft Volume License. We are currently using Exchange Server 2003. I don't know what type of license we are using, since it is setup by previous IT guy. We have almost 80 mail boxes.

We would like to upgrade to either 2007 or 2010. But I can't figure out which type of license is suitable for us. We want to spend as low as we can! :)

Any further help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
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Question by:SrinathS
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by:gerdawg
gerdawg earned 200 total points
ID: 34159106
I'm not sure what you mean by Microsoft Volume License vs a CAL.

The Microsoft Volume Licensing is a l type of licensing provided by Microsoft in which you can buy an "eopen" type of license file that you can put software assurance on.

A Microsoft CAL is simply a Client Access License, in lamens terms as I understnad it, it provides the "connection license" for you to use the exchange server from a client device. There are a few "different" types of CALS but either of the Microsoft Exchange 2003 (Device or User) CALS can be purchased as a Volume License or a "Standalone License".

Here is the thing. -Basically what you need to find out  now is if you have a pre-existing MIcrosoft Client Access Licenses for your domain so that the connection from your "clients to the exchange server" are covered under Microsoft's Licensing for compliance reasons.

Here is a good overview of Microsoft CAL's

http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/about-licensing/client-access-license.aspx

Here is a good overview of the many diffrent types of Volume Licenses:
http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/default.aspx

Sadly now I do not believe that a Microsoft Exchange CAL provides you with a usage right to use Outlook anymore as it used to so it's best to read the documentation above to see what you are in for when you purchase the upgrades.

Previously an Exchange 2003 CAL also provided you with the rights to install Outlook 2003 on the client as part of the agreement, this is no longer the case so if you didn't purchase Outlook as part of your Office licenses, you will also have to roll in these added costs as part of your upgrade.

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cclancy45 earned 300 total points
ID: 34159132
A CAL (Client Access License) is a requirement for many types of Microsoft products.

Volume Licensing is a flavor of those CAL's. While CAL's can come in several types (i.e. Retail, Volume)... MS has revamped their licensing architecture.

Volume licenses are, for lack of a better term, pools of licenses. These are typically used by organizations because they are transferable, as long as the total deployment doesn't exceed the licenses purchased.

Your existing 2003 Exchange server required two licenses, one for the Exchange Server software, and a CAL for each mailbox that will be housed on that server. You are likely involved in a volume license agreement. The wrinkle here is that the license is just a piece of paper. I would recommend you reach out to your old vendor and ask them for the eOpen agreement or other purchase order for when they originally setup your server.

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by:SrinathS
ID: 34159171
We have Outlook 2007 Small Business Edition License. Currently we have almost 80 mailboxes, but we have only 62 CALs. Is Microsoft introduced any type of Activation or strict restriction on 2010 versions?

One of local reseller, quoted me with this:

MS MBL EXCH SRV STD 2010 - 1 = 653.73
MS MBL EXCH STD UCAL 2010 - 1 = 63.65

Do I need to get 80 CALs to run 80 mailboxes (users)?
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by:cclancy45
cclancy45 earned 300 total points
ID: 34159199
Your new prospective Exchange 2010 server will not "phone home" on the 63 rd mailbox to see if you have enough licenses, however if audited you will be in licensing trouble.

You need a CAL for every mailbox to stay license compliant.
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by:SrinathS
ID: 34159204
cclancy45;

"The license is just a piece of paper." I think so, because we are running 80 mailboxes (users) even we have only 62 CALs as per agreement.

I'm planning to buy these:

Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Standard Edition - license- http://www.cdwg.com/shop/products/default.aspx?EDC=1911935

Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Standard CAL - license - http://www.cdwg.com/shop/products/default.aspx?EDC=1911937
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by:cclancy45
ID: 34159227
Looks right. You will need Qty 1 - Exchange Server 2010 and Qty 80 (or however many mailboxes you will have in the new environment) - Exchange Server 2010 Standard CAL's.

Please take note of Standard vs. Enterprise CALs. If you intend on doing any type of Unified Messaging, User-Specific Journaling, etc etc you will need Enterprise CAL's AND Standard CAL's. (they stack)...

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by:gerdawg
ID: 34159245
I have to disagree with cclancy on this one. I do not believe that a CAL covers how many "mailboxes you have" but rather the users accessing such mailboxes and/or devices that access these mailboxes.

As per my knowledge there are two types of CALs.

1) Per user
2) Per Device

Per user covers each user instance connecting to the exchange server. If I have a per user cal and I have a Windows 7 Active Sync phone and Outlook 2010 Installed on my computer then I am able to to access using ONE USER CAL the exchange server legally from either device.

With a Device CAL, you purchase a CAL for every device that accesses your server, regardless of the number of users who use that device to access the server. Device CALs may make more economic and administrative sense if your company has workers who share devices, for example, on different work shifts.

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by:cclancy45
ID: 34159270
Gerdawg-

Exchange doesn't offer a per user vs. per device licensing model.

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by:gerdawg
ID: 34159273
Basically what I am saying above is regardless if you had 1 user mailbox or 1 million the CALS only regulate the devices and/or users accessing them. There for if you have 63 users and each one of them access the Exchange server, then you need to have 63 user CALS regardless of how many physical mailboxes reside on the server.

There by User A can login to MailboxA and MailboxB and this would only require ONE USER or DEVICE CAL.
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by:cclancy45
ID: 34159300
Splitting hairs, but I see what you are saying. In the context of the original question "I have 80 mailboxes" ... I interpreted as 80 named users, therefore he will definitely need to get 80 CAL's.


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by:gerdawg
ID: 34159330
In my opinion CALS are all about splitting hairs :).

There is a lot of documentation I would recommend that SrinathS reads to fully understand what his needs are. As you have already suggested and I agree with, it would be best to go back to your reseller and verify exactly what you need with them as they are best apt to help you with these.

For us for instance, we just upgraded are 2003 licenses to 2010 exchange and Dell was instrumental in the process of what we needed based on what we already have. I would suggest anyone new on the process goes through a reputable reseller first to verify their needs as that truely is what will save them time and money in the long run.
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by:cclancy45
ID: 34159403
Agreed.
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by:SrinathS
ID: 34159482
We have 80 users on Domain Controller and all has e-mail accounts. So I need to get 80 CALs along with Server license. Am I right?
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by:gerdawg
gerdawg earned 200 total points
ID: 34159526
You are correct.
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