How do you know when to use the Administrator login to install a Microsoft Application vs using a user in the Administrator Group

How do you know when to use the Administrator login vs just being a user in the Administrator Group who supposedly has Full Control and Access.

Are there any rules to go by or do they teach this in Microsoft School. I have wasted days installing SQL Server 2008. trying to remove stuff etc. I have screwed up wasted more time and delivered information back in forth to EE for 3 days. Finally the Administrator login credentials were given to me and wallah. I got in. I was held back because the owner of the company said I should not need that password........So I kept trying to install SQL Server 2008 full install and MS CRM on this server. With no luck or love. When I tried to uninstall it it would not complete remove itself even when it said it was removed. The Add Remove Programs showed remnants.

Can anyone tell me what the rules are here????
Fletcher BurdineTableau Trainer & Consultant Sales Exec.Asked:
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bionic80Connect With a Mentor Commented:
I've run into a couple of situations where you had to use the True Local Admin - one instance happened to me when attempting to install an MMC snapin for LCS2005 on a management workstation - Run As failed spectacularly and even running the .msi from a elevated command prompt (from a local account) did not do the trick.  The only way around was to log in as the full admin, run a full admin command prompt, and install via MSIExec.  (Mind you we were in the process of doing desktop level service lock downs so a lot of it was due to the management console being one of the "test cases" but the point still applies.)  The local admin account IS useful - but 99.9999% of the time, simply running via elevation from a normal user account SHOULD install anything.
patternedConnect With a Mentor Commented:
If you were an local administrator you should have had no issue installing SQL Server.

If you were trying to integrate it with Active Directory, you would have had issues.
Rob WilliamsConnect With a Mentor Commented:
There are VERY few instances where you need to use the administrator account. as a matter of fact Microsoft best practices recommend disabling it, or as a minimum renaming it. It is a special account though, often called the 500 account, because the SID ends with 500. The only case I have seen it needed is with completing an SBS set up with 2003, but I would be interested in hearing about other cases.
Fletcher BurdineTableau Trainer & Consultant Sales Exec.Author Commented:
Yes for some reason installing CRM needed the Administrator to install on the Win2008Sever Thanks for the information
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