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SharePoint 2010: Opening document -- "Contacting server for information" for a long time

I've created a virtual lab environment with Windows Server 2008 R2 servers, SharePoint Server 2010, SQL Server 2008 R2, Exchange Server 2010, and Windows 7 with Office 2010.

Please note that this environment works very well performance wise and in other ways; the SharePoint sites loads fast for instance and everything is good -- except for one thing:

Question: When opening an Office document (Word 2010 or Excel 2010) from a document library, it takes unacceptable long time, up to a minute just to open the document, while the splash screen is showing; most of the time it says "Contacting server for information".

Also, for instance, when I check in a document, it might take minutes; everything I do with Office documents in SharePoint 2010 just takes so long time.

(If working with Office 2010 outside of SharePoint, so to speak, it is super fast.)

Anybody know why this is, and what I can do about it?

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Jack_A_Roe
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Jack_A_Roe
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1 Solution
 
luceysupportCommented:
Sounds like your database inserts.

Everything else you describe will use caching so pages will load fast.

But uploading and downloading docs use the database so I would take a look there.

Check sql profile to see how long the queries are taking and check the cpu on the server when waiting for your docs to download/upload
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Jack_A_RoeAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your suggestions! Well, what I can see is that the disk is too slow (was this a production environment) -- I've been doing some research with performance monitor on VM and host.

But fact is, that if I work with pictures ten times larger or more, there's no lag at all; whether I upload, check our, check in, etc. Also, uploading a large PDF is fast and without any performance hit.

But, once again, if I open a just about empty Word file, it takes ca 40 seconds. I also get these "lags" when checkin out/in etc; but disk etc is not a bottle neck on SQL server.

It does seem to me to be something the Office docs are trying to do which simply takes time...?
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luceysupportCommented:
The only difference between the office docs, check in etc and other docs is that the check out/in and office intergration use web services.

Install fiddler and run it while you are checking out a doc. This will show you the exact web service it is calling. Then note the times and see if there is a bottle neck on these web services.

I hope this helps
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Jack_A_RoeAuthor Commented:
Thank you for your suggestion. I've been toying around with Fiddler now, but being rather far from a web expert, I'm not sure it is helping me. - Also, now that I've started all the virtual mashines, that I shut down Friday, things are working alot smoother.

I'll let the question hang in here a little while, if somebody who has experienced the same problem has something to share.
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Jack_A_RoeAuthor Commented:
Nope, I was wrong about "smoothness": Saving a document for instance takes minutes. :-(  Only Office 2010 docs, not pics or pdfs or whatever else, demands very long time to do whatever.
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davidlopanCommented:
I had the same issue.  I used Fiddler to detect a conflict between opening Office files on SharePoint and the Symantec Backup Exec DLO agent.  As soon as I shut down the Backup Exec agent, the files opened within a reasonable time.  I'm not sure if this helps, but maybe you have some sort of backup program running as well that is causing a conflict?
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luceysupportCommented:
Have you any virus software running, if so maybe stop it and see if this changes anything.
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