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Change font size of axis labels for all embedded excel charts

Posted on 2010-11-19
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
Dear Experts:

I got dozens of embedded excel charts in a word document.

I'd like to change the font size of the diagram title, axes and axis labels in one go for all embedded charts.

Can this be done directly from Word for Windows? I attached a sample file for your convenience.

Help is much appreciated. Thank you very much in advance.

Regards, Andreas
 manipulate-embedded-excel-charts.docx
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Question by:AndreasHermle
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6 Comments
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:lwebber
ID: 34172960
Are these LINKed or EMBEDded objects? In your Word document, press Alt+F9 and look at the field codes. Are they LINK codes or EMBED codes?
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LVL 9

Accepted Solution

by:
lwebber earned 500 total points
ID: 34173559
Assuming these are EMBEDed objects, see the attached code.
Sub ExcelChartReformat()
    Dim thisInlineShape As InlineShape
    Dim excelApp As Excel.Application
    Dim excelWasRunning As Boolean
    Dim thisWorkbook As Excel.Workbook
    Dim thisWorkSheet As Excel.Worksheet
    Dim myDocumentName As String
    myDocumentName = ActiveDocument.Name
    
    If Tasks.Exists("Microsoft Excel") Then
        Set excelApp = GetObject(, "Excel.Application")
        excelWasRunning = True
    Else
        Set excelApp = CreateObject("Excel.application")
        excelWasRunning = False
    End If  'Tasks.Exists("Microsoft Excel")
    For Each thisInlineShape In ActiveDocument.InlineShapes
        If Left$(UCase(thisInlineShape.OLEFormat.ClassType), 5) = "EXCEL" Then
            thisInlineShape.OLEFormat.DoVerb verbIndex:=1
            For Each thisWorkbook In excelApp.Workbooks
                If thisWorkbook.Name = "Worksheet in " & myDocumentName Then
                    Set thisWorkSheet = thisWorkbook.Worksheets(1)
                    Dim thisChartObject As Excel.ChartObject
                    Set thisChartObject = thisWorkSheet.ChartObjects(1)
                    'Put your chart formatting commands here
                    thisWorkbook.Close SaveChanges:=True
                End If
            Next thisWorkbook
        End If  'Left$(UCase(thisInlineShape.OLEFormat.ProgID), 11) = "EXCEL.SHEET"
    Next thisInlineShape
    If Not excelWasRunning Then excelApp.Quit
End Sub

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Author Comment

by:AndreasHermle
ID: 34186726
Dear lwebber,

thank you very much for your swift and professional response. I tried your code out on a word document with 2 embedded excel files.

I added the following code line to your code:
thisChartObject.Chart.Axes(xlCategory).TickLabels.Font.Size = 8 'Put your chart formatting commands here

I am afraid to tell you that this code somehow does achieve the desired results. It opens the chart in Excel but otherwise does nothing. The embedded Excel charts in the Word Document get strangely enlarged. I got no idea why this is so.

I have attached my sample file for your convenience. The word document contains your code with my little code snippet added.

Again, thank you very much in advance for your kind help.

Regards, Andreas  Embedded-Excel-Charts-Sample-Fil.doc
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LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:lwebber
ID: 34188211
Rather than you try to explain in words what chart formatting you want, try this. In Excel, open one of the charts. Record a macro while you reformat the chart. Turn off the recorder, then examine the Excel macro. Transfer those commands to the Word macro.

The important Word variables that "hook" you into Excel are:

excelApp == equivalent to Excel's Application object
thisWorksheet == equiv. to Excel's Application.ActiveSheet object.

In your recorded macro, you may see the Selection object recorded. Selection is a member of the Application object (not the worksheet). Since the Word macro doesn't start with anything selected, you must get an explicit reference to the thing you want to reformat. That's the purpose of the Set thisChartObject = thisWorkSheet.ChartObjects(1) command.

If your recorded macro includes something like this:

    ActiveSheet.ChartObjects("Chart 1").Activate

then in the Word macro, add

    thisChartObject.Activate

Then where your Excel macro refers to ActiveChart, your Word macro would use excelApp.ActiveChart. You should then be able to copy and paste the commands from the Excel macro into the Word macro -- just be sure to prefix ActiveChart with excelApp.ActiveChart.
0
 

Author Comment

by:AndreasHermle
ID: 34189546
Dear lwebber:

thank you very much for your detailed explanations. I will give a try and let you know.

Thank you again for your professional support.

Regards, Andreas
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:AndreasHermle
ID: 34226123
Dear lwebber,

great it worked just fine. Thank you very much for your great and professional help.

Regards, Andreas
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