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Changing my domain controllers

Posted on 2010-11-19
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We have 2 domain controllers with Windows Server 2003 Standard edition 32 bits.  We want to change those servers with 2 virtual Windows Server 2008 R2 (64 bits).  We believe wecannot perform the in place update because we are going from 32 to 64 bits. We are planning in creating 2 new servers and move everythng AD, DNS,DHCP, print server role etc.  COuld somebody give us a path to follow?  We never have done anything similar.  What is especially confusing is that all our DNS resides on the main DC, if we need to eliminate it when do we  change the IP address of the new ones?  Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Question by:MariNoriega
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GridLock137 earned 500 total points
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you are corect about the upgrade path, that cannot be done.
the path should be as follows:

first create your new VMs and install your OS
promote them to DCs, not you may have to extend the schema of your domain to support 2008 servers acting as DCs, we just did the same thing here at work. after you extend the schema you can run a dcpromo on those servers to make them DCs, the second step i would take is installing DNS on the new DCs and let them talk for a day to allow the new introduction of DNS servers into your enviroment.


the next thing is to move the DHCP settings to one of the new servers, please follow these steps as outlined by microsoft: the steps are pretty much the same on 2008

DHCP

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/325473

http://www.windowsreference.com/windows-server-2008/step-by-step-tutorial-how-to-migrate-dhcp-server-from-a-windows-server-2003-to-windows-server-2008/

AD should replicate once you make those servers DCs, i recommend letting the old servers stick around for a week or so before you decommission them. the next thing is to migrate your fsmo roles, follow these steps:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324801

the last thing is to make sure you add the print service role to one of the servers and have everyone point to that server for printing, most likely you will have to install the drivers on there and if printers are loaded via a login script, modify that so it points to the correct server.


one thing i should mention is when making the changes for your DC and DNS make sure your users are logged off, once you are done make sure you pick one machine to test your login and see if it's picking up the new settings from the new DCs.



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by:GridLock137
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remember, on the new DHCP server you have to enter the new DNS server IP address so that it can provide that to your users. you should be fine, just follow the path and steps from Microsoft and you should be fine, it's pretty straigh forward. keep in mind any applications that are used by users off of servers (web based, proprietary etc..) that point to the fqdn of the old DNS server, you will have to make the change there as well to point to the new fqdn of the new DNS server.
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by:Darius Ghassem
ID: 34174603
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