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NAS or stick to SBS

Posted on 2010-11-19
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
Hi,

I currently have an SBS 2003 box which serves about 55 people and has roughly 600gb of data on it. I have just been granted a budget which will allow me to purchase a new server (probably a ProLiant DL360 or similar) to migrate up to SBS 2008. Our current 5 year old server has no fault tolerance at all (luckily nothing has failed to date - touch wood!) and I was considering migrating all data off of it and onto a NAS box, say a NetGear 2100. A few questions:

1) is it worth me introducing a NAS for file storage or shall I use the SBS 2008 once I have this finished and migrated across?

2) Will there be a noticeable difference in performance between the SBS file server and a NAS?

3) If not a ReadyNas, are there any other recommendations? I'm looking at a £2k budget for the NAS.

Thanks

Paul
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Question by:the1paulcole
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Assisted Solution

by:abt-it
abt-it earned 25 total points
ID: 34173741
The 2008 SBS can use iSCSI, so if the NAS got an iSCSI Interface would be fine.
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Accepted Solution

by:
mccracky earned 350 total points
ID: 34174153
I just replied to a similar post in another thread about what NAS to look at (http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Network_Management/Disaster_Recovery/Q_26626861.html):


QNAP is one of the higher rated NAS boxes out there.  Most (all?) of their SMB/Corporate line is VMWare/Citrix Certified.  I'd start there:  http://www.qnap.com/virtualization.asp?index=2&panel=0

http://www.qnap.com/Products.asp
http://www.qnap.com/images/products/comparison/Comparison_NAS.html

I'd look at the QNAP line (or something DIY with Openfiler).  The NAS will work fine for your scenario.
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Assisted Solution

by:The_Dark1
The_Dark1 earned 125 total points
ID: 34179785
As long as you connect the NAS through ISCSI that ouwld be fine

If you use it over the LAN, then you will create a bottleneck at the switch/firewall level.

The Access Layer of the Network

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Author Closing Comment

by:the1paulcole
ID: 34198098
That's exactly the system I'm looking for, thanks for the advice :)
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Author Comment

by:the1paulcole
ID: 34203461
Off the back of this, what disks would you fill it with? My only concern is the performance as currently, our file server is using 15k scsi disks although being an SBS, there's also a lot of other functions running on it. I've looked at velociraptors but they are a) expensive and b) don't really have the capacity I'm looking for.
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Expert Comment

by:The_Dark1
ID: 34204952
ISCSI offes you the ability to attach a device to the server iva the Network on a seperate Subnet, This way you are only polling file share traffic through this connection, not flodding the lan with information from all users.

SBS tends to get flakey when sharing large amounts of data, and it can be worthwhile looking into a NAS that supports Active directory intergration.

This way you can setup the device with shares, and use the AD on the SBS for authentication
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Expert Comment

by:mccracky
ID: 34205849
The NAS uses RAID, so I'd get disks rated for RAID and enterprise disks as the enterprise disks are spec'd for 24hr/day usage and the RAID rated disks don't try to spend inordinate amounts of time trying to recover bad sectors.  If a disk can't read a sector and tries to recover it for too long the lack of response to the request may make the raid fail the disk out of the array.

Check this page under the "Business" section rather than the "Consumer" section: http://www.qnap.com/pro_compatibility.asp
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