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c turn bit position in memory

Hello,
turn a bit sequence in c mingw,  unfortunately  i strand if i only try to print it out in the opposite direction, normal printout is properly

example:
11100101 11001110 11100001
should be :
10000111 01110011 10100111

 
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thomas2010
Asked:
thomas2010
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1 Solution
 
imladrisCommented:
The example:

example:
11100101 11001110 11100001
should be :
10000111 01110011 10100111

indicates that the second line should show the same byte sequence, except each byte is printed out in reverse order.

So, in the second loop you want to be addressing the same bytes as in the first loop (that is buffer[i/8]).
In the first loop you check the top bit first (1<<(7-(i%8)) evaluates to (1<<(7-(0%8)) for i is 0, which is (1<<(7-0)), which winds up being 0x80. For i is 1, you will wind up with (1<<(7-1)), which will wind up being 0x40. So you start by checking the leftmost (Most Significant) bit, then going down to the right (to the Least Significant) bit.

In the second loop I assume you want to check the bottom bit first. So something like:

buf[i\8] & (1<<i)

would check the byte against 0x01 for i is 0, against 0x02 if i is 1, etc. etc.
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thomas2010Author Commented:
second loop should give out each bit from right to left ( lsb to msb,)



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ozoCommented:
Another way could be just changing the loop to
for(int i = size*8; i>=0; i--)
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imladrisCommented:
>second loop should give out each bit from right to left ( lsb to msb,)

As I had surmised, and this condition for the if statement:

buf[i\8] & (1<<i)

will do exactly that. For i is 0 you will get 0x01, which is the lsb. For i is 1 you get a mask of 0x02 which is the next bit, etc.

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imladrisCommented:
Sorry, the buf index should be division, of course, just like the first loop:

buf[i/8] & (1<<i)

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imladrisCommented:
Did any of those answers help?

If so, it is now time to select and grade one (or more) answers.

If not, perhaps a clarifying question would help.
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thomas2010Author Commented:
Hi . the answer not help really,
it is still not working fine. are you sure i dont need the modulus ?

void turnbits( unsigned char *buffer, int size)
{
		//OK
		for(int i = 0; i < size*8; i++)
  	{
    		if( buffer[i/8] & 1<<(7-(i%8)) )
    		{
    				printf("1");
    		}
    		else
    		{
    				printf("0");
    		}
  	}	
  	
  	printf("turn\n");
  	
  	//Not working
		for(int i = size*8; i>=0; i--)
  	{
  		if(buffer[i/8] & (1<<i) )
    		//if( buffer[((size-1)-(i/8))] & 1<<(7-(i%8)) )
    		{
    				printf("1");
    		}
    		else
    		{
    				printf("0");
    		}
  	}	
}

Open in new window

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ozoCommented:
Either reverse the loop to i = size*8-1; i>=0; i--
or reverse the indexing to buffer[((size-1)-(i/8))] & 1<<(i%8)
not both, and not some mixture of the two
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