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Linux Server Architecture

hello there,
I would like to order a new dedicated server running on Centos v5.5 and with a Intel Core i7-920 Quadcore CPU and 24GB of ram..
I want to know what do you guys recommend and why for the architecture either 32 or 64..
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XK8ER
Asked:
XK8ER
2 Solutions
 
rit_netsysCommented:
For Server architechture, I will suggest...go for 64bit as you are using RAM more than 4GB
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XK8ERAuthor Commented:
would I be able an use the same software and applications if its 64bit?
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rit_netsysCommented:
Most of the latest version softwares will run. In some special case, you may need to check for 64bit support from software and application website. But for Long term performance and utilization 64bit is better.
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Hatrix76Commented:
sure, don't worry, in the recent distributions everything is compiled for those architectures.

the 64 bit architecture is definitly the way to go. 32bit will eventually go the way of the dodo. The biggest benefit of the 64bit architecture is the enhanced address-space. This means you can use way more ram than with the 32bit architecture.

Normally with 32bit you have at most 4 gig of ram, there are PAE extensions, which modify the kernel to use more ram, but it's like in the old days where you used the emmdriver in does to access more ram than the 640k you could address. If you remember those times. It puts more load and stress on cpu and slows down some operations considerably.

Some mathematical calculations will perform better on 64bit cpus as well, especially floating point intensive stuff, like transcoding (which can be important for PBX Systems) or media heavy stuff.

Also I saw the first big application providers (like Zimbra Mail Solutions) starting to phase out the 32bit builds, which means that over the next years at some point they will not provide 32bit binaries any more.

So, today, go for 64bit!

best
Ray
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jackiechen858Commented:
yes, 64bit for sure. Also if you can't find a 64bit version for certain software, the 32 bit version shouild still work as long as you have all the depended 32bit version library. When I use yum to install some library package, now most time it will install both 32/64 bit package.
 
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madunixChief Information Security Officer Commented:
100% 64Bit. Choosing the right installation comes down to your CPU specifications. If you have only have a 32-bit CPU then you can only install the 32-bit version. If you have a 64-bit CPU then you have the option of installing either version. Generally speaking, the 64-bit version can run 32-bit packages.

For example the 32-bit Linux will only address 16GB of RAM whereas the 64-bit Linux version  can address 256GB/1TB of RAM overall (per-process limits).

FYI, there are two primary modes of operation of the microprocessor architecture: Long mode (lm) and Legacy mode. Long mode is used by 64-bit operating systems. It combines the processor's native 64-bit mode and a 32-bit/16-bit compatibility mode. Under this mode, 64-bit, 32-bit and 16-bit applications may be supported. Legacy mode is only used by 16-bit and 32-bit operating systems.


[root@linux1 ~]# grep lm /proc/cpuinfo
flags           : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr lahf_lm

The above command with the following output shows a CPU that has 64-bit mode support (look for the lm flag). If the command returns nothing, then the CPU is only capable of running 16-bit or 32-bit code.
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joolsCommented:
64bit, the date will be running out in a few years, (ok, quite a few years) and we don't want to go thru all that again.
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