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Any difference between Primary DNS Suffix and Connection Specfic DNS Suffix

Posted on 2010-11-21
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
As I understand Primary DNS Suffix is Domain Name  ?? ( am I right )

How about Connection Specific DNS Suffix ?? -- Question (1)  

How about just " DNS Suffix " ??

Taking example : the domain name ( or primary DNS suffix ) is ABC.local
                            How about just " DNS Suffix "  ?  -- Question (2 )

                            How about "Parent Suffix of the Primary DNS Suffix ?? - Question (3)

Thanks .
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Question by:kcn
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edster9999 earned 167 total points
ID: 34182967
A DNS suffix is the 'rest of the web address' for a company that uses local names.
For example we are running a big company called example.com
We have broken the company into US.EXAMPLE.COM and EU.EXAMPLE.COM for our american and Europenan offices.

A domain suffix would be 'Example.com' so if youur machine is called KCN then you could set up windows to add the domain suffix of EXAMPLE.COM so your machines full name becomes KCN.EXAMPLE.COM

Connection specific domain suffixes are given out by DHCP when you get your IP off that server.  If you are in the european office and get a local domain you can also be given a connection specific suffix like EU.EXAMPLE.COM
which would make your machine KCN.EU.EXAMPLE.COM

Your main suffix is still valid.  You can ping both.
The connection specific one doesn't have to be the same domain.  It could be :
KCN.EUROOFFICE.COM
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by:kcn
ID: 34183158
Thank you . Allmost very clear to me .

But need to know the following "words" for what it meant ??

In the TCP/IP Properties > Advanced button > DNS Tab >

(1) There are "Parent Suffix of the Primary DNS Suffix " what is that meant ??
(2) So the Primary DNS Suffix is EXAMPLE.COM ?? Am I right ?   ( corret / wrong )
(3) If my computer IP is 192.168.1.55 . When I ping  " KCN.EXAMPLE.COM "   
      and "KCN.EU.EXAMPLE>COM"  , I will ping to the SAME address ( 192.168.1.55 ) ??    
     (correct/wrong)

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Assisted Solution

by:Chris Dent
Chris Dent earned 333 total points
ID: 34187357

1. If you have a name like this:

computer.aname.bname.cname.com

Then the DNS Suffix Search List will include each of these (even if they are not explicitly written down):

aname.bname.cname.com
bname.cname.com
cname.com

com is not included as it is a single label-name, each of the rest represent the valid parent suffixes.

Note that example.com has no *valid* parent suffixes to add to a search list.

2. If your internal domain name is abc.local then your Primary DNS Suffix is typically abc.local. If you are not operating in a domain environment the Primary DNS Suffix is arbitrary (anything you please).

3. No. Only if someone has created Host (A), or Alias (CNAME) records for each of those names mapping it to the IP address you specified.

Also remember that you only implied that your computer had the IP 192.168.1.55 and the name KCN. If that is not true it makes the question confusing.

Chris
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Author Comment

by:kcn
ID: 34187814
edster999,

Are you saying that "Connection specific domain suffixes  " given by DHCP ( if my machine request IP from DHCP ) will make my machine FQDN as  "KCN.EU.EXAMPLE.COM " if I am in EURO  or maybe make my machine FQDN as  "KCN.EUROOFFICE.COM"  . The first "FQDN" is follow my domain name and the second possible FQDN might not neccessary follow my original domain name ???

Please clarify . Thanks .

Thanks Chris for explanation (1) and (2) .
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Assisted Solution

by:Chris Dent
Chris Dent earned 333 total points
ID: 34460021
> and the second possible FQDN might not neccessary follow my original domain name ???

Yes. Although in the example you have both a connection specific, and a Primary DNS suffix so the original domain name is still accounted for.

If the only DNS suffix for the client were to change around like that you'd be looking at disjointed namespace, something that takes a fair bit of work to configure. You'd want to be very familiar with both DNS and AD before approaching a topic like that.

Chris
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