installing Ubuntu desktop on Dell Mini 9

I want to install Ubuntu desktop 10.10 on my mini 9
(16 GB SSD, W GB RAM). Should I partition the hard
drive or just give Ubuntu on the entire 16 GB drive?
I will be upgrading to 2 GB RAM. Next week when my
memory module arrives. Should Ubuntu handle the
memory change without a problem?
Thanks
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snailcatAsked:
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profjohan11Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Hi,

Well the partitioning would depend whether you would want to install another operating system as dual boot with ubuntu i.e. windows xp. If you are only going to be using Ubuntu then you might as well partition the whole drive or use the whole drive otherwise it would be lost space.

As for the memory as long as you meet the minimum memory requirements the memory should be seamless to the operating systems. And I am sure that 2gb is more than enough. For i386 platforms this is the minimum hardware requirements.

https://help.ubuntu.com/10.10/installation-guide/i386/memory-disk-requirements.html

You must have at least 44MB of memory and 500MB of hard disk space to perform a normal installation. Note that these are fairly minimal numbers. For more realistic figures, see the section called “Meeting Minimum Hardware Requirements”.

Installation on systems with less memory[4] or disk space available may be possible but is only advised for experienced users.

Kind Regards,

Johan
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Grant1842Commented:
If you are upgrading to 2gigs of ram total then a 32 bit os (Ubuntu) will use that.

If you are going over 4gigs of ram  you need to use a 64bit os(Ubuntu) to use all the memory this is just for 32 and 64 bit specs.
The real limit of your memory is what your motherboard is set up to handel.

And looking around
http://www.crucial.com/store/listparts.aspx?model=Inspiron%20Mini%209%20(910)

your computer will handle 2 gig max.

In general I always partition my drives so I can keep important things (Drivers) on a septate partition when I need to do a quick format.

Also if you want to set up the computer to a DUAL BOOT os it is better to have them on separate partitions.
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Frosty555Commented:
Ubuntu will handle the memory upgrade just fine, there won't be any extra configuration needed, it will be plug-and-play.

Partitioning is up to you - but a 16gb SSD doesn't give you much breathing room. If Ubuntu is the only thing you're planning on having on your computer, then I'd just use the default partitioning that the Ubuntu setup will present to you. No need to mess with it unless you are doing something special like a dual-boot setup.
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rindiCommented:
As most of today's PC's don't come with installation or recovery media for the originally installed OS, you should first make such recovery media so you can restore it to factory defaults in case you want to sell it again after use. Some PC's have a recovery partition and a utility included to create such media from that partition You should find the necessary procedure in your manual or maybe in the Dell FAQ's on their site.

Once you have good recovery media I would use the complete drive for the new OS, but also here I'd probably go more for Linux Mint than ubuntu (Linux mint is an "Improved Ubuntu", with better plug'n'play and hardware support).
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snailcatAuthor Commented:
Thanks to all

Any recommendations for disk imaging before I change the OS?

My external CD drive from Dell is dead so Ideally I need a utility that can boot from a USB Flash & access the backup image from an external USB hard drive. Unfortunately Dell has no option to boot from the SD card.

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Alan HendersonConnect With a Mentor Retired marine engineerCommented:
Another vote for Linux Mint 10
I switched from Ubuntu a month ago. It's easier to install and set up and it's more intuitive for Windows converts. The main problem you're likely to have is getting your wireless to work if it's Broadcom.

I've written everything you need to know about imaging here:
http://www.justwondering.co.nz/wiki/Imaging

Paragon software have made their Backup & Recovery 2010 available, free, for non-commercial use. Get it here:
http://download.cnet.com/Paragon-Backup-amp-Recovery-Free-Advanced-Edition/3000-2242_4-10972187.html?tag=mncol
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Alan HendersonRetired marine engineerCommented:
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rindiCommented:
PartedMagic has an imaging utility included, and you can put it on a USB stick with the Unetbootin tool.

http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/
http://partedmagic.com/
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Alan HendersonRetired marine engineerCommented:
Apologies.
I misread the imaging post.
Thanks Rindi for that useful information. Wish I could give you some points!
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bz43Commented:
Not going for any points.  Just pointing out a good installation guide:
http://www.howtoforge.com/the-perfect-desktop-ubuntu-10.10-maverick-meerkat
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