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Server 2003 / Windows 7 Pro Domain Profiles Question

Posted on 2010-11-21
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10

Greetings,

I'm looking for clarification regarding Windows 7 Pro & Server 2003 Active Directory Setup:

I first Setup and logged into Windows 7 Professional with same username and password that I will need to join the local office domain.
I THEN successfully joined office domain.
Restarted PC.
I logged into the computer with log in screen displaying:
ComputerName\UserName.
After logging in with  ComputerName\Username I reviewed the
System Properties>Advanced Settings>Computer Name Tab and it reads as:
Full ComputerName =  CompuerName.domain.local
Domain =             Domain.local

My questions are:
1. Since I logged into the computer as "ComputerName\UserName am I actually logged into the domain given the info I included above?
2. When the log in screen displays  ComputerName\Username is this user & PC governed by the Domain Policies?
3. If I have the users log in with log in screen displaying  ComputerName\UserName are there any known issues using Windows 7 Pro with a Server 2003 Active Directory Domain setup?

I can log out of  ComputerName\UserName and then "Switch" Users to log in in as  Domain\UserName successfully but I obviously have 2 different Profiles.

Any insight / info is appreciated.

Thank you.
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Question by:COM1
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5 Comments
 
LVL 2

Assisted Solution

by:Etnacom
Etnacom earned 400 total points
ID: 34184248
Hello,

1) If you are logged in as COMPUTERNAME\Username, you are not logged into the domain, you are logged into the local computer.

2) The PC seems to be a member of the domain and is thus governed by domain policies. However, the local computer user is not. You must be logged in as a domain user to be subject to domain user policies.

3) There are no major issues with logging on as a local user, except for the fact that you won't be utilizing the Active Directory domain for user authentication.
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LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:moon_blue69
ID: 34184257
Hi

I think there is local computer policy and any domain policies (including default, any ou specific gets applied) and the logon screen appears. Since the computer is joined as the member of domain it will show its properties. From the logon screen you decide to logon locally and it takes it locally but whatever settings applied until remains and any policies pertaining user from domain is not applied

hope this answers
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LVL 76

Accepted Solution

by:
Alan Hardisty earned 800 total points
ID: 34184258
1. If you login as computername/username you are MOT logged into the domain, you are logged in exactly as you were before you joined the domain.

2. If you login as computername/username your computer is not going to be controlled by domain policies.

3. There are no issues with this.

What you should be doing is login as Domain/username so that policies will be applied and then you can access domain resources.

If you don't login as domain/username there is no point joining the domain.

Once you have joined a domain, you will always have 2 profiles, but you will only use the domain profile.
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LVL 9

Assisted Solution

by:ken2421
ken2421 earned 800 total points
ID: 34184302
COM1,
WIthin a DOMAIN it is normal and expected that all users will use Domain name\username. Yes it does create a second profile, the domain profile where all of their mapped drives and resources should be. If you use exchange this is the primary authentication. In the future all other users would log onto this PC as Domain Name\User Name. At that time their domain profile will be created on this PC.

Normally once users are on a domain PC they never use anything but the domain login regardless of the Windows version.

HTH,
Ken
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:COM1
ID: 34184887
Thank you all for your time and expertise. I plan to utilize ProfWiz to relocate the local profile settngs already configured into the correct "Domain" profile on the local PC and have all users begin logging in under the DomainName\user login. Again, I appreciate the time you took to respond to my question.
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