JBOD partition on Ubuntu

Ubuntu 8.04
6 JBOD 600 disks

My developer requested that I create one partition from all the JBOD disks.  He doesn't want RAID.  How do I create this?
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arnoldConnect With a Mentor Commented:
May be this is what your developer has in mind,
This is still a stripe (RAID 0) no fault tolerance)
That can be interpreted 2 ways, does he request a "whole-disk" configuration, with technically no partitions, or does he request a disk be built with a single partition.

Best practices, is a single-partition,  meaning if you have /dev/sda as the device name for the whole disk, then /dev/sda1 is for first partition on the whole drive

Here is a nice tutorial w/ examples, going under premise that it is not a whole-disk config
md168Author Commented:
It is an 8 disk system.  I have mirrored drives for the boot partition.  The developer wants /data to consist of 6 disks.  

Your posting is missing the link with the examples.
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Sorry ..


The first example on 5.2 will be fine for you, just create 1 primary partition per disk.
/data consisting of 6 disk could mean that they want a single RAID 0 partition.
The size of which will be 6*600 and provides no fault tolerance.  i.e. a failure of any drive will result in total data loss.
You would use mdadm to create /dev/md0 that is made up of /dev/sd[a-f]

mdadm --create --verbose /dev/md1 --level=0 \
   --raid-devices=6 /dev/sd[c-h]
md168Author Commented:
arnold:  The developer specifically said no RAID.  I don't understand why he would want the one drive to fill up, then use the next, then the next (append mode).  
You do not have to call it raid, you can use LVM and group all the drives as a single volume.  You might as well go back to the developer and have them clarify what exactly do they want.  
Do they want something like:

Depending on the application that is being used.  You might as well ask what size files will be common, this way you can optimize the performance if there will be only large files. You would not need to allocated a large  number of inodes i.e. mkfs.ex* -i 150000  /dev/sdax etc.
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