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Change Memcache Allocated Cache Size

Posted on 2010-11-23
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How do I adjust the default cache size for memcached? Right now it set to the default 64Mb
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Question by:72impala
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by:farzanj
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Here is the man page memcached.  Command used is shown below.

memcached -m <Memsize in MB>


http://linux.die.net/man/1/memcached
memcached -m <Memsize>

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by:torimar
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It seems you need to allocate the cache size via a command switch "-m" in the command that starts the memcached service.

A typical command for twice the amount of cache (128 mb) would be:

/usr/bin/memcached -d -m 128 -u root

Set the "128" to the size of cache you require.
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by:72impala
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Ok, I ran this command /usr/local/bin/memcached -d -m 128 -u root but when I check it still says 64MB

http://freebootlegmovies.net/memcache.php?&op=1
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torimar earned 250 total points
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You may have to first stop the memcached instance already running / kill the process, then run the command.

(I can't open your link, it's password protected)
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