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IPv6 Addressing

am new to the IPv6 addressing schema though I have a thorough understanding of IPv4. I am currently trying to put an addressing plan together for the current equipment I have on the IPv4 based on a range I'm given for IPv6. My difficulty is how to address the equipment based on the IPv6 range. Ex: If given an IPv4 range of 192.168.1.0/24 I know I can address the equipment as such: 192.168.1.1, 198.168.1.2, 198.168.1.3.....198.168.1.254. but how do i perform the same function given an IPv6 address of say: 4FDE:0000:0000:0002::/64 given a range of 4FDE:0000:0000:0002:0000:0000:0000:0000 - 4FDE:0000:0000:0002:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff. Can I set it up similiar to IPv4 i.e. 4FDE:0000:0000:0002:0000:0000:0000:0001, 4FDE:0000:0000:0002:0000:0000:0000:0002, 4FDE:0000:0000:0002:0000:0000:0000:0003, 4FDE:0000:0000:0002:0000:0000:0000:0100, 4FDE:0000:0000:0002:0000:0000:0000:0254 or is there another way to go about this.
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solarisjunkie
Asked:
solarisjunkie
1 Solution
 
Matt VCommented:
IPV6 is normally automatic except for your main router interface.  It will use the MAC address of the network card to assign an address.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6#Stateless_address_autoconfiguration_.28SLAAC.29

Otherwise, the way you have posted will work, but the whole genius of IPV6 is that the network might change but the local part of the address is always tied to the MAC so it will not change.
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donmanrobbCommented:
Generally you would want to use autoconfig which generates the host portion of the /64 address from the host mac-address.
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ICCNetworkAdminCommented:
I would also recommend using autoconfig. Although IPv6 may seem complex at this point, it is intended to be easier to maintain than IPv4.
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IPv6GuyCommented:
Yes, you can subnet your IPv6 allocation, depending on what size you receive.  

The important thing to remember is that a /64 is the starting point - you can't (or shouldn't) try to subnet a /64. Each subnet/network/network link (whatever you want to call it) should have a unique /64 assigned to it.

If you have a larger allocation, such as a /48, it provides you 16 bits of subnetting (64-48=16). Thus, with your examples above, you could create the following subnets:

4FDE::0001/64
4FDE::0002/64
.
.
.
4FDE::FFFF/64

How did we get this? In this address:
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0001

The last four sections are the 64 bits reserved for the hosts, the section marked FFFF is 16 bits; if you were allocated the 4FDE::/48 subnet, those FFFF's are the bits you could use to subnet.

Make sense?
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solarisjunkieAuthor Commented:
I'm trying to address VLAN's with IPv6 addressing keeping certain addresses associated to specific equipment as in IPv4 i.e router = .1 switch = .2 dnsserver = .40 and was wondering how can I keep that same consistency for IPv6. Thanks much for the article as I'm reading up on autoconfiguration. My last question is I do understand that IPv6 is in hex so i would have to address it as such 0001 - 0009 then 000a, 000b, 000c, 000d, 000e, 000f then 0010, 0011, 0012, 0013,0014,0015,0016, 0017, 0018,0019,001a,001b,001c,001d,001e,001f,0020,0021....etc. Am I right as far as the addressing here?
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solarisjunkieAuthor Commented:
So when I address the hosts portion not choosing to do it via autoconfiguration can it be as such as IPv6 is in Hex

4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0001
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0002
.
.
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0009
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:000a
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:000f
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0010
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0011
.
.
.
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:001a
.
.
.
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:001f
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0020

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solarisjunkieAuthor Commented:
So when I address the hosts portion not choosing to do it via autoconfiguration can it be as such as IPv6 is in Hex

4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0001
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0002
.
.
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0009
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:000a
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:000f
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0010
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0011
.
.
.
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:001a
.
.
.
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:001f
4FDE:0000:0000:FFFF:0000:0000:0000:0020

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IPv6GuyCommented:
You can still do autoconfiguration on the /64 subnets.

Part one of the equation is figuring out how to allocate your /64s by using the subnetting shown above, then setting up the RAs on each subnet to advertise the proper network prefix. You can then choose to autoconfigure (SLAAC) or you can set the Managed and/or Option bits in the RA to use stateless or stateful DHCPv6.
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