Improve company productivity with a Business Account.Sign Up

x
?
Solved

iphone wi-fi through my secured Linksys router

Posted on 2010-11-23
4
Medium Priority
?
1,035 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-10


I just installed the Cisco-Linksys WRT54G2 Wireless-G Broadband Router and secured it with the older WPA encryption, because one of my wi-fi devices is from 1995.

The problem is with my iPhone.  I expect to walk into my apt and have great Wi-Fi, which I do, but I have to enter that huge Key AGAIN after I've been out and using the Wi-Fi at the coffee shop or elsewhere.

What do I have to do, in order to automatically connect with my Wi-Fi when home, without having to enter that long Key each time?

The iPhone lets me save a setup for either a DHCP, BootP or Static (whatever those are).  I can then enter the IP Address, Subnet mask, Router, DNS, Search Domains and (for DHCP) Client ID.  Is this what I need to do.  I suppose I could get this info from logging on to the router from the computer to which it is cable-connected.

Thanks
0
Comment
Question by:WaterStreet
4 Comments
 
LVL 16

Accepted Solution

by:
Ady Foot earned 800 total points
ID: 34197981
The iPhone will automatically remember any wireless network that it has been connected to until you tell it to 'Forget This Network'.  The router will provide the phone with all of the IP address, subnet mask etc when it connects so you don't have to worry about that.

If you've not been using the 'Forget This Network' button then I'd say you might have a problem with the phone.
0
 
LVL 28

Assisted Solution

by:jhyiesla
jhyiesla earned 600 total points
ID: 34198531
afoot is correct, it should just remember it. The only issue that I have had with this is a time that I had to reset a wireless router and for some reason it didn't' connect right until I reentered the info.  But on a daily basis, i can be at work on my work WiFi or on 3G and when I walk into the house it connects to my WPA2 secured WiFi without issues and just works.

If you have an Apple store nearby take it in there and have them look at it or call Apple Tech support; they are usually pretty good with these things.
0
 
LVL 26

Assisted Solution

by:akahan
akahan earned 600 total points
ID: 34198932
The only reason it would "forget" your settings would be if the SSID on your wireless network is the same as the SSID somewhere else that you're connecting to, but the other network doesn't have encryption.

So, if you haven't already, you might want to change your wireless network's SSID to something other than the default "Linksys".

Assuming your wireless network is running DHCP (which means that your various devices are automatically issued an IP address when they connect to the network), you would just set the iPhone to DHCP for that network; you shouldn't have to enter the IP address, subnet mask, or anything along those lines.
0
 
LVL 18

Author Closing Comment

by:WaterStreet
ID: 34259348
All of your input was helpful.  I stuck with it and eventually the iPhone automatically remembered (thanks afoot).
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: SSL Checker

Scans your site and returns information about your SSL implementation and certificate. Helpful for debugging and validating your SSL configuration.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Tech spooks aren't just for those who are tech savvy, it also happens to those of us running a business. Check out the top tech spooks for business owners.
In this article I will be showing you how to subnet the easiest way possible for IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4). This article does not cover IPv6. Keep in mind that subnetting requires lots of practice and time.
In this video we outline the Physical Segments view of NetCrunch network monitor. By following this brief how-to video, you will be able to learn how NetCrunch visualizes your network, how granular is the information collected, as well as where to f…
Monitoring a network: how to monitor network services and why? Michael Kulchisky, MCSE, MCSA, MCP, VTSP, VSP, CCSP outlines the philosophy behind service monitoring and why a handshake validation is critical in network monitoring. Software utilized …

606 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question