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ESXi Performance monitoring best practices (performance counter selection list)

Hi All,

I received error when i try to analyze the speed or performance issue on my VM, when i try to turn on some of the counters I got the following error:


Is there any guideline or description on which counter shall i put into to analyze disk speed performance issue ?

Thanks

Kind Regards,
JJ
graphing.jpg
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jjoz
Asked:
jjoz
3 Solutions
 
louisreevesCommented:
I would say the issue you have is due to the version of ESX. ESXi is a free product. you are not going to get get very good monitoring without vcenter server. This is the full service application which includes windows counters to give you all the monitoring you will need. ESXi may have more functionality but you will need to buy liscenses. If I am mising anything about the question please let me know if I made any wrong assumptions about the question.

Happy Holidays~!
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jjozAuthor Commented:
hm.. but at least i can get one or two counters like the following:

does this looks like a problem or OK as normal load ?
diskGraphs.jpg
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Danny McDanielClinical Systems AnalystCommented:
that is a general limitation within the GUI that you can't select more than 2 counters at any one time.  If you want to graphically view historical performance data, you can go to the console to collect the performance data with the vm-support command and use batch mode to dump it into a file that can be read with perfmon.  esxplot from http://labs.vmware.com/flings/esxplot will show the batch data, too, and doesn't take as long to load as perfmon, but I don't remember if you can view more than one measurement at a time.

The data is stored in the VC's database, if you are using vCenter, so it's also possible to find or create your own application that can pull the data out of the database.
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xylogCommented:
In general, when looking at storage related issues, you want to look at IOPS. That is Input/Ouput operations Per Second. If you are saturating your disks capacity for IO operations you will see degraded performance. Specifically in a VM environment you need to consider how many guest instances are accessing your disk simultaneously. If I have 4 guest instances accessing a volume which is a 2-disk mirror set, I have 4 vms on two spindles. Each disk can handle a certain amount of IOPS so adding disks to a volume will give you more IO capacity.
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jjozAuthor Commented:
@xylog: how can I see the IOPS status in VCenter ? is it possible ?
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xylogCommented:
You already have it in your picture there, its called "Disk Commands Issued."
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jjozAuthor Commented:
(-_-)" thanks xylog, I didn't know it because it doesn't say anything about IOPS :-|
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