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IPv6 Linux

Posted on 2010-11-24
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
I have a Linux server connected to a VLAN that I've given an IPv6 address to. The issue is I am receiving a totally different prefix then what I have set up on the Vlan. Is there something in the Linux server that could be causing the issue or could it be pulling the address info from a router. I've attached the "sh ipv6 int brief" output and the server hosts file as well as the ifconfig on the interface.



Troubleshoot-DNS-Server.txt
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Question by:solarisjunkie
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by:IPv6Guy
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What are the settings in your Router Advertisement?
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by:solarisjunkie
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I figured out one part as I had to finish configuring IPv6 on the VLAN correctly but I now receive the new IPv6 address I was looking for and still receiving the old address. You mentioned settings in my router advertisement, please expalin ?
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by:bevhost
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Does the address begin with fe80:: ?
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by:solarisjunkie
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Yes it does
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by:IPv6Guy
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The Router Advertisement (RA) contains two bits, M (Managed) and O (Other)

If M=0, O=0, devices will use Stateless Autoconfiguration
If M=0, O=1, Devices will use Stateless Autoconfiguration AND contact DHCPv6 for OPTIONS ONLY
If M=1, O=1, Devices will contact DHCPv6 for both IP Address and Options.

My thought was that you might have a misconfiguration between your configured subnet and the addresses handed out by DHCPv6.
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bevhost earned 500 total points
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Take this example

fe80::250:56ff:feb0:2f65 is the IP address on a computer of mine.
MAC HWaddr 00:50:56:B0:2F:65
Notice how they both end in b0 2f 65, and the IP has fffe in the middle

This is because it is a link local address.
Any IPv6 interface should have one and the link local network address is always fe80:: and the local part is usually derived from the Hardware MAC address.

Some computers (eg Windows) can also use Privacy where they simple use a random 64 bit number. So that it can't be traced back to your mac address.

see
http://packetlife.net/blog/2008/aug/4/eui-64-ipv6/
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by:solarisjunkie
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I'm receiving two global and one local link and was trying to determine where the unwanted global link is being generated from.
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