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Return defined name of cell

Posted on 2010-11-24
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
I'm creating a verification code for a workbook and want to autopopulate cells based on the colour of the cell.

Some cells need to be filled in with that cells defined name so that they can be easily tracked throughout the workbook. I've attached the code that I am trying to do this with (stuck getting the second loop to return cells defined name) but it is currently just returing the cell's location on the sheet not the defined name of that cell.
Private Sub CommandButton5_Click()

    Dim rCell As Range
    Dim pg As Worksheet
    Dim N As Single
    Dim aColor As Long ' Data entry for random number (Light Blue)
    Dim bColor As Long ' Data entry for words - set by cell defined name (Very Pale Blue)
    Dim cColor As Long ' Verification data that shouldn't be changed but should be removed prior to issue (Tan)
    Dim dColor As Long ' Data/Formulas that shouldn't be changed or removed prior to issue (Very Pale Green)
    Randomize ' Initiate random number generator
    aColor = RGB(153, 204, 255) 'Specify the color range for random numbers
    bColor = RGB(204, 255, 255)
    cColor = RGB(255, 204, 153)
    dColor = RGB(204, 255, 204)


For N = 1 To Sheets.Count
    For Each rCell In Sheets(N).Range("A1:AZ500")
        If rCell.Interior.Color = aColor Then
        rCell.Value = 0.6 + (0.3 * Rnd)
        Else
        End If
    Next rCell
Next N

For N = 1 To Sheets.Count
    For Each rCell In Sheets(N).Range("A1:AZ500")
        If rCell.Interior.Color = bColor Then
        rCell.Value = rCell.Name
        Else
        End If
    Next rCell
Next N

End Sub

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Question by:Haydan
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5 Comments
 
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by:Michael74
ID: 34209582
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by:Michael74
ID: 34209610
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byundt earned 250 total points
ID: 34209648
If the workbook has been saved and the name refers to a single cell, then you can use:
rCell.Value = rCell.Name.Name
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Author Closing Comment

by:Haydan
ID: 34209721
Why do you have to go .Name.Name?
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Expert Comment

by:byundt
ID: 34209847
Haydan,
The explanation is a little tricky:
The Name property of a Range object returns a Name object
The default property of a Name object is its address
The Name property of a Name object is the name of that object

So following the first and second points, rCell.Name will return something like =Sheet1!A1
Following all three points, rCell.Name.Name returns what you need--the name of the cell

I had to look up the syntax of the Name property and object to arrive at the explanation. But I've encountered this question before, and it was far easier for me to remember the stuttering pattern of .Name.Name as the way to get the answer.

Brad
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