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Virtualbox on Widows 7 pro : Windows 2000 Pro

My client has a peer to peer network consisting of 4 pc’s running Windows 2000 pro.  One of the pc’s died.  He has legacy software which will only work on Windows 2000 pro.  He has a new pc running Windows 7 pro.  Obviously Windows 2000 pro cannot be loaded onto a 64 bit pc.l

1.)      I understand how to construct a peer to peer network.  It seems Virtualbox is free.  If  I installed Virtualbox onto the Window 7 pc, how would I configure Virtualbox so the other old pc’s can read / write to a share on Virtualbox?    Somehow the network card on the Windows 7 pc has to communicate with VirtualBox.

2.)      Will Virtualbox install on a Windows 7 pc and can Windows 2000 pro be loaded as a guest o/s on Virtualbox?
1 Solution
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
You appear to be a little confused about the technology... Windows 2000 CAN be loaded onto any machine Windows 7 can be.  The only POSSIBLE problem is if you don't have drivers for the hardware.  While 95% of computers today are x64 systems, that means they are ALSO x86 systems (x64 is 100% compatible with x86) so there is no reason (again, other than drivers) that you couldn't load Windows 2000 onto the new system.

Well, there is another reason - OEM licenses CANNOT be loaded into Virtual computers OR onto other systems, so if they don't have FULL retail licenses of a volume license for Windows, then they cannot use 2000 on the new machines or in VMs.

As for VirtualBox... no idea.  I've VMWare Server and Hyper-V and I have a 2000 server running in a hyper-v virtual machine.  Windows 7 pro comes with Virtual PC (well, it's a free download that also provides a Virtual XP license), so I'm confused why you would not use that instead.
1. By default, a VirtualBox virtual machine is configured to share the host's network connection (NAT). The virtual machine would then appear under the host machine's IP. This should suffice for your pupose.
If necessary, networking may also be "Bridged", which would let the virtual machine appear as a separate networking device with an address of its own in the network.

2. Yes and yes.

Please check out this resource, too: http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Migrate_Windows
You might be able to use the HDD of the dead computer to turn it directly into a virtual machine.
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