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analog fax line

hello experts,

I live in the netherlands, and we stil use a fax.
we have a new fax device wich need moor signal.

Is there a amplifier for the good old analog telefoon line.
Who can help me?

Regard bas.
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bastouw
Asked:
bastouw
6 Solutions
 
InteractiiCommented:
An amplifier will probably not help you; unless you are running over an extraordinarily long cable, a simple level amplifier will not improve the quality enough to help the situation.

Even the poorest quality modern phone line should be able to make a successful fax transmission at low speed, the technology is very very established. Is the problem that it is not connecting or just that it is connecting too slow?
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Alex BaharCommented:
An amplifier will distort the signal and things will get worse.

If you think the volume is too low, then you may want to contact your telco for checking the telephone cables between the telco switch and your premise. There might be loose joints or corrosion somewhere.
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caballo_oscuroCommented:
the very nature of fax is that it uses the phone line, i.e. to anywhere in the world. there must be a either a physical problem with the fax machine or the line. the fax machine is one that is intended for use in the country for which it is installed i assume. Conversley you could use one of the web based services were you email them the copy and they then use a local break out service to transmit the fax to the recipient. best wishes
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caballo_oscuroCommented:
what a load of links. the public telephone system is designed for use anywhere in the world reffer to my original answer.
the very nature of fax is that it uses the phone line, i.e. to anywhere in the world. there must be a either a physical problem with the fax machine or the line. the fax machine is one that is intended for use in the country for which it is installed i assume. Conversley you could use one of the web based services were you email them the copy and they then use a local break out service to transmit the fax to the recipient. best wishes
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viki2000Commented:
Indeed a lot of links, but are educative and helpful depending by the technical knowledge level.

bastouw definitely has a problem with his fax machine and he was thinking it is about levels of signal.

To split the problem in half you have to find out if the fax machine has a problem or the line.

For the telephone line and its levels is enough to do simple tests as: using a telephone try to make some phone calls, eventually send DTMF tones when you call an automatic service, for instance from telephone company. Additionally you may connect a PC with a modem and try to connect over internet with old dial-up way. You may use next trial software http://www.passmark.com/products/modemtst.htm 
If these are working then probably the line is good and you have to focus on your fax machine.
You could do more complicate measurements, but perhaps is better to call a technician form telephone line company.


The analog line has a standard and the parameters of the line is specific for each country: http://www.hermonlabs.com/Products/innerData/pdf/Analog%20Telephony%20Overview.pdf 

From where did you buy your fax machine and what type is it?
And why not to try to connect/test your fax machine in another location (another socket, room, office)?
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bastouwAuthor Commented:
Thanks everybody
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