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Active Directory Structure

Posted on 2010-11-29
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
I am in the process of scoping the best structure for an Active Directory implementation.  I am being told we should stick with a single Forrest, a single tree and a single domain and use OCs to define location and user settings.

I am not knowledgeable enough about AD to know which questions to ask but I do have an understanding that the design decisions in this early phase is critical to future administration success.

We have 9 locations within a 30 mile radius and I am hoping to get a better understanding of the strategic factors we should be considering prior to settling on a AD design.

Are there limitations to using a Single, Forrest/Tree/Domain Structure?  If so what are they?

When setting up the Name Space, how important is it to define the structure initally?  Is it a simple process to make changes later?

Please Advise
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Question by:Tony_Rhoades
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Mike Kline earned 500 total points
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Yes the single forest/domain structure is the way to go here.   You can use OUs to internally organize or if you want to split out the locations for different delegation and group policy.

You can also use active directory sites as a replication boundary.

In Windows 2000 and 2003 you could only have one password policy per domain.  Since this is a new setup I'm guessing you will use 2008 or 2008 R2 and fine grained passwords will be available to you.

It is not important to define the structure of AD initially if you mean by structure things like OUs and group policy.  The big thing you will have to think about initially is the name  you can pick the same name as your public name i.e. company.com or pick a different name company.local.  Good overview here   http://www.anitkb.com/2010/03/active-directory-domain-name.html

...both ways are workable.

Thanks

Mike
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