Solved

How can I tell from within a VM what memory and CPU is allocated to it?

Posted on 2010-11-30
8
398 Views
Last Modified: 2012-06-21
if I look at the resources in task manager from within the VM am I getting an accurate look at the resources allocated to the VM or are these the resources of the host?

is there some way for me to tell from the VM without having access to the VM ware console? (as I am just an admin installing software on it and need to verify it meets specs)


thanks,
bobby
0
Comment
Question by:ob1_
8 Comments
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
coolsport00 earned 125 total points
ID: 34239361
Right-click on My Computer (assuming a Windows guest OS) and select Properties to see the CPUs and RAM. Open up My Computer to check disk space.

Regards,
~coolsport00
0
 
LVL 6

Author Comment

by:ob1_
ID: 34239430
is that definitely CPU and RAM of VM and not host?
0
 
LVL 6

Author Comment

by:ob1_
ID: 34239436
is there a way to cap RAM in the background in VM manager so that available RAM you see from host is not what is actually available? that is the problem I think we are running into.
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:coolsport00
ID: 34239456
Correct...of the VM, not the host.

I don't understand your 2nd comment about the problem you're running into...
0
How to run any project with ease

Manage projects of all sizes how you want. Great for personal to-do lists, project milestones, team priorities and launch plans.
- Combine task lists, docs, spreadsheets, and chat in one
- View and edit from mobile/offline
- Cut down on emails

 
LVL 2

Assisted Solution

by:frevere
frevere earned 125 total points
ID: 34239482
The resources you see in Task Manager is an accurate view of resouces the host is allocating to the guest OS.  For example, if you see 1.5GB RAM and 2 pCPU, then the VM in the console has been configured for 1.5GB RAM and 2 vCPU's.  This doesn't necessilarly mean that the VM is actually using these resources.  To see the exact amount of resources the VM is actually using at any one point in time, you will have to view the Resource Allocation tab in the VMware client.
0
 
LVL 9

Assisted Solution

by:Bill_Fleury
Bill_Fleury earned 125 total points
ID: 34239514
Any resources that are visible from within the VM are the resources that have been assigned to the VM.  You cannot view host properties from within the VM- this is done through vCenter.

I believe what you're getting at with your second comment is to see if the VM is requesting more RAM than is physically available on the host.  This is not available from within the virtual machine, you would have to check with your VMWare admininistrator about host statistics regarding this.
0
 
LVL 2

Assisted Solution

by:JanEnEm
JanEnEm earned 125 total points
ID: 34243766
Do not forget that what your VM's software sees is equivalent to what a physical host would see.
So, I guess, if your assessing the software functionality on that VM, you must not change your working method from what you use to do on a physical machine.

If, as an example, a software product would use an excessive amount of memory, the VM will start to get a huge amount of page faults ans start using its page file, as it would do in a physical situation.

JanM
0
 
LVL 6

Author Closing Comment

by:ob1_
ID: 34395459
all good info - thank you!
0

Featured Post

What Is Threat Intelligence?

Threat intelligence is often discussed, but rarely understood. Starting with a precise definition, along with clear business goals, is essential.

Join & Write a Comment

This is an issue that we can get adding / removing permissions in the vCSA 6.0. We can also have issues searching for users / groups in the AD (using your identify sources). This is how one of the ways to handle this issues and fix it.
In this article, I will show you HOW TO: Suppress Configuration Issues and Warnings Alert displayed in Summary status for ESXi 6.5 after enabling SSH or ESXi Shell.
Teach the user how to rename, unmount, delete and upgrade VMFS datastores. Open vSphere Web Client: Rename VMFS and NFS datastores: Upgrade VMFS-3 volume to VMFS-5: Unmount VMFS datastore: Delete a VMFS datastore:
This video shows you how to use a vSphere client to connect to your ESX host as the root user. Demonstrates the basic connection of bypassing certification set up. Demonstrates how to access the traditional view to begin managing your virtual mac…

747 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

10 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now