How to set up wireless in a warehouse?

The customer has a large warehouse, with several thick brick-and-steel walls spaced throughout.  I would assume that this means that we can't use one simple AP with a good antenna--because it would not provide good coverage throughout.

What I'm trying to understand is how you set up good wireless coverage using multiple APs in an environment like this.  Specifically:

1) Would all the APs have a hard-wired CAT5E cable running to them--just like I would do with a simple, single AP setup?

2) Is there a way to use multiple APs--to get good coverage--while at the same time having the wireless equipment (such as user laptops) "think" they are seeing just one SSID with a strong signal?  As the laptop user moves away from one AP, and into the next room with a different AP, it would be great if the laptop's wireless connectivity didn't even know that anything changed, where it would continue to stay connected to the same SSID, with the same IP address, etc.  Is this even possible?  If so, what type of equipment would be used, and how would it be configured?

TIA


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sasllcAsked:
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reijerCommented:
You can use engenius acces points.
These acces points can be set as acces point or as wireless repeater.
I used these in a huge building to enable wireless trough thick walls.

This is the product: EnGenius M36
 m36.jpg

http://www.engenius-europe.com/products/mesh-ap/engenius-m36-mesh-802-11b-super-g-high-power-up-to-28dbm-ap-wds-repeater.htm

It looks like a smoke detecor
You can also use it for internet access etc.
Your wireless device automatically checks the best coverage (with using the ssame sssid.

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sfossupportCommented:
What you need to do is to do an initial site survey.

Wireless Site Survey : The process of planning and designing a wireless network, in particular an 802.11 Wi-Fi wireless network, to provide a wireless solution that will deliver the required wireless coverage, data rates, network capacity, roaming capability and Quality of Service (QoS).

There are a number of factors that determine the final placement of access points (AP) throughout a facility including:

   1. Required throughput - What sort of data will be transmitted between the access points and the client devices? A cutoff point in kilobytes per second should be determined prior to the actual survey.
   2. Number of clients - How many end users would be connected to a single access point (AP) at a time? If you're installing a wireless network in a 500 seat lecture hall filled with users demanding high bandwidth you can easily criple a single AP. What sort of load can a single AP handle, and how many will be needed in highly dense client environments.
   3. Facility Environment - Into what sort of environment will the APs be installed? Will there be materials that will absorb signal (large rolls of paper, dense products), which may require more APs? Is there high metal racking that may limit the horizontal reach of the signal?
   4. Indoors or outdoors - Will you need to use certain weatherproof enclosures or antennas to battle harsh weather conditions? Will you need to put the hardware in a heated enclosure?
   5. Geographic location - What country are you testing in? Different countries have different allowable frequencies in which the network can occupy.
   6. Neighboring networks - Is there a large amount of interference coming from nearby 802.11 networks? If so, is this interference on the 802.11 b/g (2.4ghz) spectrum, or the 802.11a (5ghz) spectrum?

Here is the link I got this from and more info:
http://www.milesdata.com/wireless-site-survey/wireless-site-survey.php

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