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Daniel WilsonFlag for United States of America

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How to transfer C: drive to new disk

My Windows Vista Pro machine has an 80-GB disk on which the C: drive resides.

With Windows updates, software installation, etc, I have fewer than 100 MB left. The Windows folder itself uses about 35GB.

There's very little that I can move off to a D: drive.  I could uninstall & reinstall some software, moving a few GB to another disk, but that's only a temporary solution.

I intend to put in another drive in the 250GB - 1 TB range and put the C: drive on it.

But I can't afford to reload Windows & all my software.  I need to move the C: drive onto the new disk.

What should I be looking at?  Norton Ghost? Some other utility? Some RAID trick?  (currently I'm not using any RAID)

Thanks!
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David
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Hmm ... I was looking at OEM drives from TigerDirect. I believe I've usually gotten those with just the drive.

A utility like that is worth paying a bit more for the drive, though.

Have you had good luck with any particular manufacturer's utility?
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marsilies

Just to note that's I've used both the full version of Acronis and Seagate DiscWizard, and they both work well.

Also, you can use the WD and Seagate/Maxtor tools with OEM drives, they're both free downloads.
Well, to be honest, I'm in the 'biz, so have a lot of external RAID enclosures and some NAS/SAN appliances, and enough HDDs that would make you sick .. so never had to use such a utility.  I throw the CDs away.  
I do have a license for Acronis on some of the systems for making binary clone backups.  It has never failed me.
Thank you both!
You may also want to avoid the OEM drives anyway.  One reason they cost so much less is that the warranty typically defers to the retailer, which is why they cost less.  (It isn't so much the extra $1.00 worth of paper)

So for an extra $10 or so, you can get a 3-5 year factory replacement warranty with Seagate, vs 30-90 days with a web retailer?   That should also be an easy decision to justify going retail packaging.