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Wake on lan

I have not previously had a use for wake on LAN. Will an external rdp request over port 3389 wake a powered down Pc/server with wake on LAN enabled?
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epichero22
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It can be enabled on any port and it's relative to whether your BIOS supports it or not.
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Bios does support wake on LAN .  So just rdp request will start it?
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A local machine is not a option because with the server down there is no dns or dhcp for the workstation.  I normally never shut any server down but this one is set to shut down when the battery hits critical low.  with the server bios set to always on the machine should come back up, but only if this battery loses all of it charge.  if it does not lose all battery, the power system never cycles completely off after a power fail so the server just sees the shutdown and never fires back up because the battery never completely died and server never actually had total loss and return of power which is what always on feature needs to restart.  its a small window but it happens

if that makes sense
Are you referring to the battery on a UPS?

If so, you may want to invest in SmartUPS by APC.  The larger models (typically for servers) not only permit monitoring, but can provide you with battery life as well as permit you to hot-swap batteries.  Just a thought.

Thanks though!
I see what you are saying. Always On in response to a power loss, but since the server shuts down gracefully in response to a critical battery condition, it is not seen by the server BIOS as a power loss.

I know you've already closed the question, but here is one idea: you might set the server to automatically power on at a certain time of day if the BIOS supports that; at least you know it will come back up by itself at say 4:00 or 5:00 AM if it shuts down during the night.

Or here's another suggestion, and one that I've used before:

1. Set up a workstation or server on your LAN and give it a static IP outside of your DHCP scope (so it does not need DHCP). This will be your monitoring machine.

2. Install Servers Alive (SA) on it. It is free for up to 10 checks. http://www.woodstone.nu/salive/index.asp.

3. Then set up Servers Alive (SA) to monitor the server in question via IP address rather than by name; that way DNS is not needed either. Or if you'd rather, add the server's name and IP in the monitoring machine's HOSTS file. Whatever floats your boat.

3.5 Some servers with Wake On LAN enabled will respond to ping even if they are down, so set up SA to check something else to determine if it is down; something higher-level, like disk space. You can set it to check every x minutes, only check at certain times of day, only during the week, only on weekends, etc.

4. Then have SA send a Wake On LAN/magic packet automatically whenever it detects the server is down. You can set it to do this as long as the server is down. When SA detects that the server is back up, it will stop sending magic packets. You can also set it to send you an e-mail or text when it is down, and another when it comes back up.  Or it can send an SNMP trap, or update a webpage, or send an AIM/MSN/ICQ message, or...you get the idea. Also, any "or" in that last sentence can also be "and."

SA has saved my bacon on more than one occasion. I highly recommend it. We use the heck out of it; we had the free version for about a 2 days before we hit the 10-check limit and quickly decided to buy the enterprise version due to our large environment and its incredible usefulness. In addition to the many built-in checks there are also several dozen free add-on checks as well. It you know or have a programmer you can also write your own add-ons (it's pretty easy; we have around 20 or so home-made ones ourselves).

No, I don't work for Woodstone, nor do I get anything for referrals. It just rocks.

If you decide to go that way, I can help get you up and running with it pretty quickly if you want.


Thanks for the ideas.  Will check bios start time first as that would be the easiest.  Will check sa after that.