Removing vlan 1 from trunk

I would like to know if there are any problems associated with removing VLAN 1 from all trunks.  I found the following from Cisco's website:

Remove VLAN 1 from the allowed list so you can disable VLAN 1 on any individual VLAN trunk port in order to reduce the risk of spanning-tree loops or storms. When you remove VLAN 1 from a trunk port, the interface continues to send and receive management traffic, for example, Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP), Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP), Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP), Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP), and VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) in VLAN 1.

Is this true that management traffic passes even when VLAN 1 is disabled for all Cisco switches?  What about other managed switches such as Dell?
B1izzardAsked:
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eeRootConnect With a Mentor Commented:
You can safely disable VLAN 1 as long as the network traffic has other VLAN's to use.  Most management protocols are layer 1, trunking affects layer 2 traffic.  The management traffic that uses layer 2 (SNMP, telnet, ssh, etc) can be set to a specific management VLAN meant just for network administration

The configs can be a bid tricky when you use different vendors, but yes, you can use switches from other manufacturers.
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B1izzardAuthor Commented:
If it uses another VLAN for traffic, any idea on how it chooses the VLAN?  Does it use the numerically lowest VLAN, cost, or ???
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jjmartineziiiConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Yes, on cisco switches, management traffic is still passed. Not sure about other vendors.

This article may help:

http://blog.ipexpert.com/2011/01/19/old-ccie-myths-vlan-1/
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eeRootCommented:
No, vlan's are not auto-detected.  It would depend on the IP address of the device, whether software or the operating system has been set to tag the network traffic with a particular VLAN, and what the switchport's native VLAN setting is.
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B1izzardAuthor Commented:
Thanks.
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