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Will the Orange 62.5/125 micron Fiber cable support 10Gb

Posted on 2011-02-10
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I am in the process of redoing a network for a client.  They have existing 62.5/125 Fiber in the building.  They have three floors and around 6 switch closets.  All the switch closets are connected via 1Gb Fiber.  I want to move them to 10Gb from switch to switch but I do not know if the existing cabling will support it.  If it does can you please provide documented proof?  I trust most everyone here I just want to see it for myself.

Thanks for your insight,

Tucker
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Question by:Neadom Tucker
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3 Comments
 
LVL 123
ID: 34867290
you've got Single Mode Fibre (SMF) and Miulti Mode Fibre (MMF).

Less than 300m you would use MMF, over 300m SMF. MMF cables are usually orange/aqua, and SMF yellow, that's the standard.

According to ISO/IEC 11801, which was made in September 2002, multimode fiber are classified and renamed to be OM1, OM2, and OM3. OM1 multimode fiber refer to traditional 62.5/125 cables, OM2 multimode fiber refer to traditional 50/125 cable, OM3 multimode is the name of 10 Gigabit multimode fiber optic cables, which is also 50/125 diameter. The 10g fiber optic cable is also called "Laser Optimized Cable".

Firstly, do you have the current specifications of the cable currently in use, e.g. part numbers or documentation, or the technical specification sheet that comes with fibre cable.

Was the cable installed before Sept 2002, I think you will be looking at replacing the cable for OM3 specification, unless you've got the specs.

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lrmoore earned 2000 total points
ID: 34871104
Wikipedia has some good references
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10_Gigabit_Ethernet#cite_note-10

Older 62.5/125 cabling does support 10G, but you won't get the same distance as with the newer OM3 50/125 10G optimized cabling. It is fine for short distances.
Bottom line is that you need to be aware of the longest link that you will have to deal with, and provide the most appropriate 10G optic driver module.
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by:Neadom Tucker
ID: 34872683
Thanks!
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