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Why or why not Virtual Remote Desktops on Windows 2008 R2

Posted on 2011-02-11
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I find the Microsoft Website amazingly difficult plowing.

Are you using Virtual Remote Desktops and (briefly) why?

Does this setup require additional license per connection beyond the RDP-CALs for virtual?
ie Does a virtual Desktop run it's own license XP, 7 or Server?

Does it make Adobe CS4 or Quickbooks run wizbang better, perhaps? (in a small business 10 or so people 3 concurrent at any time, perhaps)

Comments appreciated.
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Question by:MMarria
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Accepted Solution

by:
amichaell earned 1000 total points
ID: 34875647
I've not specifically used MS Virtual Remote Desktops, though I can probably answer some questions.

1. You are looking at a license per each VM.  Virtual or physical...still need a license.
2. Doubt it will make those apps run any better than a physical machine unless the physical machines aren't too good.  
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by:HawyLem
HawyLem earned 500 total points
ID: 34875676
I'll answer you as I've already done in another post for the licensing question:

http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/about-licensing/virtualization.aspx

Summary: three rules to follow

1) You need licenses for the maximum number of instances running on a server at any time
2) You may create and/or store as many instances of the server without additional licenses (we are not referring to running ones, here)
3) You may move running instances between servers, just keep in mind that a server cannot exceed the maximum number of instances is licensed to run

This in the server guests scenario.

I don't think any program would run a lot better, considering that a virtualized environment relies on the underlying hardware substrate, so the performance of the undermachine would be reduced (not increased excepted some rare cases)
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Author Comment

by:MMarria
ID: 34876704
Thanks guys-
   I am wondering if there is any reason to even turn it on in this small shop, and as I suspected,
other than the geek interest by me, I would not be doing any favors for this shop. Every body get s point for good contribs.
   Anybody else on this?
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LVL 14

Assisted Solution

by:amichaell
amichaell earned 1000 total points
ID: 34876723
Seems overkill to me.  Will likely introduce unnecessary complexity.  In a larger shop something like this (or Remote Desktop/XenApp) can help with centralized management.  I wouldn't for something this size, though.
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LVL 96

Assisted Solution

by:Lee W, MVP
Lee W, MVP earned 500 total points
ID: 34876877
Some technologies are used to increase management capabilities and reduce hardware costs and possibly some licensing costs. VDI (Virtual Desktop Infrastructure) which is the concept your talking about is one of those technologies.  

With any technology, you have to do a cost/benefit analysis.  VDI provides some flexibility in how and where people work.  IT can make it easier for a person to not have a dedicated workspace but at the same time, have a dedicated computer.  Frankly, I don't see a huge benefit over terminal services and in general, see a greater cost.  While there CAN be some special instances where this is beneficial, most of the time, a Terminal Server would prove more useful.

Performance wise, you would almost certianly not see any improvements - if anything you would see performance decreases - IN GENERAL, HyperV/ESX(i) will provide virtual machines running on them 80-90% of the hardware's actual capability.  That means a 10-20% performance HIT, provided they otherwise have enough RAM and processor power.
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Author Closing Comment

by:MMarria
ID: 34885067
I appreciate the feedback from all - as I was already there I wanted to make sure my bias was supportable.

Thanks again.
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