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How do I tell what the collation is of a SQL Database from ONLY the .bak file

I need to rebuild my SQL server from scratch.  I have a backup of the database but that is all.  Thoughts?
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bdfirm
Asked:
bdfirm
3 Solutions
 
QlemoC++ DeveloperCommented:
That is all you need. Just install MSSQL again, then perform a
   restore filelistonly from disk='Complete Path and File Name of .BAK';
to see which datafiles where included (e.g. log and data could have been in different locations), and then
   restore database NewDBName from disk='Path and file as above' with move 'LogicalFile1' to 'NewFileName1', 'LogicalFile2' to 'NewFileName2', ...
The "LogicalFileN" are those retrieved by the restore filelistonly.
If you are certain you have the same folder structure as with the original database available, you can omit the complete with clause.
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bdfirmAuthor Commented:
When I install SQL 2005 I'm asked for a collation.  Shouldn't it match the collation of the .bak file?  I was wondering if I could find out the collation of the .bak BEFORE installing SQL.  
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geek_vjCommented:
>>When I install SQL 2005 I'm asked for a collation.  Shouldn't it match the collation of the .bak file?  I was wondering if I could find out the collation of the .bak BEFORE installing SQL.  

Unfortunately, there is no way to find out the collation of the server/database from .bak file. So the best way is to install SQL Server with the default collation first and restore the database. Post which, you can check the collation of the database that was restored. If the collation is not matching, then you can always change the server collation at a later point.
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Aaron ShiloCommented:
hi THIS IS A QUESTION TO geek_vj

How Do You " change the server collation at a later point"
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EE_AutoDeleterCommented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

                           
No comment has been added to this question in more than 21 days, so it is now classified as abandoned and is now flagged for deletion.


If there is a valid solution, please OBJECT and indicate the comments that are, or would otherwise lead to, a solution.


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QlemoC++ DeveloperCommented:
The answer given in http:#a34879905 is correct.
One info is missing though: The DB collation does not need to match the server collation. The latter is used for anything regarding the server itself, that is database and login names, system object names (tables and views), aso. A case-sensitive collation requires you to write the database name with exact case hence.
However, the names and data used in tables inside of user databases are subject to the DB collation.
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QlemoC++ DeveloperCommented:
Objection: https:#a34879905 and the new comment https:#a41623079 should be accepted.
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