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Crop a picture in Powerpoint

Posted on 2011-02-13
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I would like to know what is wrong with my code below as the cropped image does not end up the right size.

i need the macro to resize the selected image to 12.71cm wide, then to crop off evenly from the top and bottom the left over image above the required height, 3.4cm.  There may be instances where the original image is portrait shape but regardless, its needing to be 3.4 x 12.71 in the end.


Sub CropPic()

    Dim oSlide As Slide
    Dim oPicture As Shape
    Dim oshpR As ShapeRange
    Dim fd As FileDialog
    Dim strFile As String
    Dim sngCropSize As Single

    ' Set oSlide to the first slide in the presentation.
    Set oSlide = ActiveWindow.View.Slide
    Set oPicture = ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange(1)
    oPicture.Width = 363.14
    sngCropSize = oPicture.Height - 97.14
        oPicture.PictureFormat.CropTop = sngCropSize / 2
        oPicture.PictureFormat.CropBottom = sngCropSize / 2
    Set oshpR = oSlide.Shapes.Range(Array(oPicture.Name))
End Sub
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Question by:RubyFuse
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12 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:JSRWilson
ID: 34882980
CropTop and cropBottom crop based on the ORIGINAL size so you need to get the original size and adjust each time the size changes. I think your conversions are slightly out too.

Try:


Sub CropPic()

    Dim oSlide As Slide
    Dim oPicture As Shape
    Dim oshpR As ShapeRange
    Dim fd As FileDialog
    Dim strFile As String
    Dim sngCropSize As Single
    Dim sngOrigHeight As Single
    Dim sngNewheight As Single

    ' Set oSlide to the first slide in the presentation.
    Set oSlide = ActiveWindow.View.Slide
    Set oPicture = ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange(1)
    'Get orig height
    With oPicture.Duplicate
    .ScaleHeight 1, msoTrue
    sngOrigHeight = .Height
    .Delete
    End With
    oPicture.Width = 360.2
        sngNewheight = oPicture.Height
        sngCropSize = (sngNewheight - 96)
        oPicture.PictureFormat.CropTop = (sngCropSize * (sngNewheight / sngOrigHeight)) / 2
        sngNewheight = oPicture.Height
        oPicture.PictureFormat.CropBottom = (sngCropSize * (sngNewheight / sngOrigHeight)) / 2
    Set oshpR = oSlide.Shapes.Range(Array(oPicture.Name))
End Sub

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LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:JSRWilson
ID: 34882983
96 should probably be 96.34 I think
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Author Comment

by:RubyFuse
ID: 34885664
Hi JSRWilson

Unfortunately this still doesn't get the right height, even with the 96.34 changed.  My end height is 7.45 which is half of the original height.

Any other suggestions?

Thanks Ruby
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LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:JSRWilson
ID: 34885945
Did you use all of the code?
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Accepted Solution

by:
JSRWilson earned 500 total points
ID: 34886028
Ok maybe it should be:

Sub CropPic()

    Dim oSlide As Slide
    Dim oPicture As Shape
    Dim oshpR As ShapeRange
    Dim fd As FileDialog
    Dim strFile As String
    Dim sngCropSize As Single
    Dim sngOrigHeight As Single
    Dim sngNewheight As Single

    ' Set oSlide to the first slide in the presentation.
    Set oSlide = ActiveWindow.View.Slide
    Set oPicture = ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange(1)
    'Get orig height
    With oPicture.Duplicate
    .ScaleHeight 1, msoTrue
    sngOrigHeight = .Height
    .Delete
    End With
    oPicture.LockAspectRatio = True
    oPicture.Width = 360.2
        sngNewheight = oPicture.Height
        sngCropSize = (sngNewheight - 96) / 2
        oPicture.PictureFormat.CropTop = (sngCropSize * (sngOrigHeight / sngNewheight))
        oPicture.PictureFormat.CropBottom = (sngCropSize * (sngOrigHeight / sngNewheight))
    Set oshpR = oSlide.Shapes.Range(Array(oPicture.Name))
End Sub

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Author Comment

by:RubyFuse
ID: 34887383
Yes, used all of the code.
0
 
LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:JSRWilson
ID: 34887402
The ammended code seems to do it here.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:RubyFuse
ID: 34887407
Excellent, thanks!
0
 

Author Comment

by:RubyFuse
ID: 34887648
If I were to do this for an image size of
0
 

Author Comment

by:RubyFuse
ID: 34887661
Sorry, if I was to do this for an image size of 3.29 x 3.4cm what would need to change?  I added in the dimensions but got a result with a minus crop measurement which mean parts of the image were transparent.  Happy to post this as a separate question if need be.
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Expert Comment

by:JSRWilson
ID: 34889414
If you get a negative value it would mean it's impossible to crop to this size. (it's already less)

You would need to set the height and crop left & right maybe.
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Expert Comment

by:JSRWilson
ID: 34889428
If you have 2007 onwards you can use a picture placeholder which will auto crop BTW
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