Standard Declaration Module

Posted on 2011-02-13
Medium Priority
Last Modified: 2012-05-11
1. Where is the "Standard Declaration Module" in ms Access?

2. How do I get to the " "Standard Declaration Module" in ms Access?

3.How and where do I put the following code in the  "Standard Declaration Module" in ms Access?

Public gblnRegistered as Boolean
Question by:cssc1
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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP) earned 800 total points
ID: 34884298
See the images below.

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by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)
DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP) earned 800 total points
ID: 34884307
1) Each Module (regular or Form/Report) has a Declarations section

2) Create a New Module if necessary ... which will automatically put you in the Declarations section.
Otherwise, do as show in image 1 above.

3) See image 2 above.

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RgGray3 earned 400 total points
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You would create a standard module   (Modules container, NEW)

Just start making your declarations...

Make them public as you have shown in your example...
They are available

Anything before the first Sub or function is the declarations section

For more information refer to scope in the help util
Understanding the lifetime of variables
Understanding Scope and visibility
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by:Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 400 total points
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I think you're referring to the "General Declarations" section of a "Standard Module". I've added a screenshot that might be a bit more clear.

To create a module, you can either use the Database window as suggested earlier, or you can do it directly in the VBA Editor by clicking Insert - Module (or by right-clicking in the Project Explorer and selecting Insert - Module).
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by:Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE) earned 400 total points
ID: 34887347
<<1. Where is the "Standard Declaration Module" in ms Access?>>

  Just to add a bit, you have three basic types of modules:

1. A module attached to a form or report
2. A Standard module
3. A Class module.

  All can be accessed by the VBA editor window.   All have a declartions section at the top where you can declare variable (use a dim statement) and constants (use a const statement).

  Where and how you delcare something determines what can see that variable.  For example, when you declare a variable at the procedure level, only code in the procedure can see that vairable.   When you do it at module level, if declared with the keyword private, only code in that module can see the variable.  If you declare it as Public, then it can be see from any module.


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ID: 35003440
Thank you all!

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