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What direction show I be looking at in building a equipment check out database

Posted on 2011-02-14
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Right now we just have a sign out sheet created in excel. But we are looking at building a database to keep track of who, how often a piece of equipment is checked out, and when it is checked backin. We would like to keep it in the same format as our current check out sheet.

I figured I would need a table for the equipment with a relationship to a table for checking out and checking back in. But I am not sure if I should also have a table that is a merge of the two to get the report to display the way we currently have it.

I am open to any better ideas or better method of database creation.

I have attached the excel file we are using for our sign out sheet.
Equipment-Checkout-Sheet--New-.xls
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Question by:Everwulf
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jppinto earned 125 total points
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If you have a table for the equipments and a table for the "movements", when you want to create a report, you just need to build a Query that will join the information from both tables so that you can display it on the report. You movements table should have a field that is a key from the equipments table so that you can relate one with the other. You don't need to build a third table to join the data from the two tables, the query is used just for that. Then you can use this query as the source for your report.

jppinto
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by:Everwulf
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Thats what I was hopeing for. I work from that direction. Thank you.
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