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Ethernet Automatic Fail Over if connection is lost.

Is there a product available that can be installed on an ethernet port so that it allows for two connections, so that if there is a failure on one connection the other connection(wire) will take over?  Computer connected via crossover cable to an IP Device, need two seperate paths to the IP Device, one gets cut and the other takes over...
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tech-Author Commented:
TP-Link TL-R488T Quad WAN Load Balance Enterprise Router
http://sewelldirect.com/TP-LINKQuadWANEnterpriseRouter.asp

Can this unit be used to connect a single pc to a single IP device to provide redundancy between the two if two TL-R488T's are purchased?  

We need to provide redundant paths of ethernet between two devices.  IP Device #1 would connect to LAN Unit #1, then WAN #1 Port Unit #1 would be connected to WAN #1 Port  Unit #2 and WAN #2 Port Unit #1 would be connected to WAN #2 Port  Unit #2, IP Device #2 would be connected to LAN of Unit #2?
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tech-Author Commented:
Or do I use two managed switches at each device?

Sage Recommended on another question:


Ling aggregation (LAG) works as a charm if you have several lines between your switches. Lines should not have any rate limiting or shaping, and port should have to go down if the line is broken (as an example, when this statement is not true imagine fiber line with media converters (fiber to copper) at both ends. so both switches have cat5 connections and in some cases (depends on media converters) cat5 connection stays up, when fiber line is broken)

I would suggest to use 802.3ad (LACP) protocol between switches, so they could negotiate LAG parameters.
LAG is good because it converges very fast and is logically one link (from a switch's point of view) and under normal conditions throughput can be aggregated (it is not always true, when you have only single host (load sharing is done per IP or MAC) at each side).

However LAG it is not the only technology you have.
You could utilize Spanning tree protocol or you can use L3 redundancy - OSPF routing. In case of OSPF you don't need switch ports to go down, when line goes down. In this case convergence time is longer (ospf route via failed link have to timeout before traffic will flow via second line)

(http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Misc/Q_25092098.html)
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tech-Author Commented:
Two of these switches, one on each end, with two ports configured using Link Aggregation or Spanning Tree?
Cisco SRW208-K9-NA SF 300-08 8-port 10/100 Managed Switch- 8-ports, 10/1000Mbps, 1.6Gbps

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giltjrCommented:
Can the IP device have two NIC's?

If it can't then you still have a series of single points of failure.

The devices NIC, the patch cable between the device and whatever it is connected to (a switch I would assume) and then the device it is connected to (a switch).  No matter how much "redundency" you stick between the device and your network, you still have a single point of failure.

Adding more devices would just make the network more complex and prone to more failures.
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tech-Author Commented:
I agree with you.  The IP Devices are specialized units and only support one NIC.  We are going to use Link Aggregation.  This project is way more complex than decribed here.  Thanks for your input.
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