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Routing Table Mod

Posted on 2011-02-14
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Last Modified: 2012-06-21
We are currently running a single Class A/24 network (10.0.0.0/24).  What we're looking to do is have another computer/s connected to this internal network but on a seperate Class/Subnet, like a Class C/3 (192.168.0.1-4/30).
A few computers in the 10.0.0.0/24 network need to be able to remote to, ping and access the computer that is going to be in the 192.168.0.1-4/30 network.
How do i do this?

I believe i do a Route Add to my routing table to accomplish this?
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Question by:mwwebb
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by:Ernie Beek
ID: 34888063
Well, if you plug everything into one switch (to put it simple), that won't work. Both subnet need to be routed to get from one to the other.
What you could do in this situation is add a secondary ip address (in the second range) on the few computers that need to connect.
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by:mwwebb
ID: 34888184
Erniebeek:
What if instead of using 192.168.0.0/30, we used the same subent as the class A network. 10.0.0.0/24 and 192.168.0.0/24.
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by:Ernie Beek
ID: 34888249
That doesn't matter. They're still different (and logical) separate network. So to get from one to the other there needs to be some routing in place. If you want to go from one network to the other, the computer will go to the default gateway for all networks it doesn't 'know' and if you're in the 192.168.0.0 you don't know 10.0.0.0.

Otherwise (if possible) you might want to set up VLANs
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by:mwwebb
ID: 34888267
thats what im looking for, what kind of routing is needed to get from the class A to the class C network.
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by:Ernie Beek
ID: 34888372
Depends on the capabilities of your networking hardware. Ideal would be if you had a layer 3 switch. In that case you can create the VLANs and do the routing between them within the same device. Otherwise you still need a device to do the routing for the networks....
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by:mwwebb
ID: 34888401
Ok, this makes sense now i just need to figure out how to do it.  What kind of device do i need to use? Would RIP be capable of handling this?  Could you elaborate a little more on how to accomplish what im trying to do here?

(i.e., device name/type, protocols to use etc..)

btw, thanks for your help so far
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Ernie Beek earned 250 total points
ID: 34888508
I'll keep it somewhat open, because there are several brands (with several pirces :-~ ) which can accomplish what you want. Allthough I prefer Cisco, it's not one of the cheapest.

So the nicest way would be to get a layer 3 switch, configure (atleast) two VLANs on it and allow routing between them. You configure the switchports to be accessports for one of the two VLANs and connect the correct machines to it. The exact howto depends on the brand/model you will be using.

The cheaper way would be to create two separate physical networks. That way you could even use unmanaged switches. One switch for the 192.168.0.0 network and another for the 10.0.0.0. You then hook up the two using a routing device. This could be your gateway/firewall device in which you define one network as the internal network and the other one as the DMZ. This way you can control in that device, which machine may go from one network to the other and which may not.

For this setup you can easily use a static route, no need for routing protocols (makes it needlesly complicated).
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Author Closing Comment

by:mwwebb
ID: 35385001
Thanks for the help, didnt really find what i was looking for but was very helpful
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