Terminal Command to replace text in a text file with the MAC address of the machine

Hello,

I have a text document that has a machine's MAC address in it. I need to copy this file to multiple machines and would like to have a terminal script/command to replace the old MAC with the MAC of the new machine. I am using OSX 10.6 but I'm sure most Linux commands would work as well. I don't want to use a perl script or anything like that if I can avoid it. A basic UNIX command would be great. Can anyone help me or steer me in the right direction?

Thanks for all your help.
WindhamSDAsked:
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AriMcConnect With a Mentor Commented:
You could also try making the file path more absolute like this:

~$ sed -i "s/00:25:00:cf:2d:8e/$MACADDR/g" ~/Desktop/testmanaged.plist

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AriMcCommented:
If your textfile /tmp/test.txt has a placeholder MACADDR for the MAC-address, then this could work:

export MACADDR=`ifconfig | grep eth | awk '{print $5};'`
sed -i "s/MACADDR/$MACADDR/g" /tmp/test.txt

You might need to experiment if your NICs show up as something else than ethX or if your Linux-tools output formats are different from my Debian.

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AriMcCommented:
Oh, one more thing: make sure your ifconfig command directory is in your path-variable or use an absolute reference (/sbin/ifconfig in Debian).

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WindhamSDAuthor Commented:
Thanks Ari,

Here is the part of the document that I want to autochange in bold italics:

<key>en_address</key>
      <array>
            <string>00:25:00:cf:2d:8e</string>
      </array>
      <key>generateduid</key>
      <array>
            <string>B9BDD8EA-4FD2-4522-9FF6-9152D617A5B0</string>
      </array>
      <key>ip_address</key>
      <array>
            <string>127.0.0.1</string>
      </array>
      <key>mcx_flags</key>
      <array>

Here is the output of my ifconfig:

lo0: flags=8049<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST> mtu 16384
      inet6 ::1 prefixlen 128
      inet6 fe80::1%lo0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x1
      inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 0xff000000
gif0: flags=8010<POINTOPOINT,MULTICAST> mtu 1280
stf0: flags=0<> mtu 1280
en0: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
      ether 00:25:00:a1:05:1a
      inet6 fe80::225:ff:fea1:51a%en0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x4
      inet 10.64.130.99 netmask 0xffff0000 broadcast 10.64.255.255
      media: autoselect (100baseTX <full-duplex>)
      status: active

I always want it to update with the en0 address. Will the same commands you posted work in this instance. I use terminal all the time to issue commands, but not at the level of making and replacing text.

Thanks!
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AriMcCommented:
I think this would work in your case:

export MACADDR=`ifconfig | grep ether | awk '{print $2};'`
sed -i "s/00:25:00:cf:2d:8e/$MACADDR/g" /tmp/test.txt

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WindhamSDAuthor Commented:
I think we are getting close Ari,

This is what I entered and the error I received:

~$ export MACADDR=`ifconfig | grep ether | awk '{print $2};'`
~$ sed -i "s/00:25:00:cf:2d:8e/$MACADDR/g" Desktop/testmanaged.plist
sed: 1: "Desktop/testmanaged.plist": extra characters at the end of D command

Any ideas? Thanks again.
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berniepCommented:
Looks like it's reading the filename Desktop/... as an argument.  Try this without the -i:

sed "s/00:25:00:cf:2d:8e/$MACADDR/g" Desktop/testmanaged.plist >newfile

If that works, then move or copy the newfile over the original:

sed "s/00:25:00:cf:2d:8e/$MACADDR/g" Desktop/testmanaged.plist >newfile &&
cp -f newfile Desktop/testmanaged.plist
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WindhamSDAuthor Commented:
Bingo! Absolute path...this wouldn't have been an issue because the real location of the file is buried in the /var/ directory, but I was testing it on my desktop. Appreciate all the help!
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WindhamSDAuthor Commented:
Thank You for your input too burniep
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