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Simpler powershell question

Posted on 2011-02-14
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Im playing with powershell in order to learn more about it. So probably a very simple question here.

I have a directory called c:\test in it there is a single text file. Now if i run the following command

dir | get-member

It returns all the methods and properties of the text file. Some of these i see are creationtime, lastaccessedtime, fullname, etc.

What I would like to know is how do i actually return those values? So say I wanted to get the lastaccessedtime of the file that is in my test directory. How would I go about that.


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Question by:Joseph Daly
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by:KenMcF
KenMcF earned 664 total points
ID: 34891330
you would do something like this

gci c:\NAMEOFFILE.txt | Select name, lastwritetime

if you want to export that

gci c:\NAMEOFFILE.txt | Select name, lastwritetime
 | export-csv c:\export.csv
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by:Joseph Daly
ID: 34891401
Is there another way of doing this other than GCI? I watched a webex session today where the person used another method of getting the data not using GCI. Unfortunately I was trying to multitask during the presentation and figured I could watch the replay, but they do not have it available for replay.

From what I remember it had something to do with using a . (dot) seperator to get the info. I think it had to do with the get-member cmdlet????
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by:JOSHUABT
JOSHUABT earned 668 total points
ID: 34894203
I think what you might be looking for is something like this:

$d = gci .\
$d[0].lastwritetime

A collection of files is returned from the current folder.  You can then reference the first file by the objects subscript.  All of the properties can be accessed by using the dot notation.

You can determine how many files were returned to your collection type: $d.count

if yuu want to see the methods just type: $d | gm

--- Hope that helps.




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Chris Dent earned 668 total points
ID: 34895404
Just in case:

GCI is an alias for Get-ChildItem. dir and ls are also aliases for get-ChildItem.

That means that each of these commands are identical:
Get-ChildItem c:\stuff | Select-Object Name, LastWritetime, LastAccessTime, CreationTime
gci c:\stuff | Select-Object Name, LastWritetime, LastAccessTime, CreationTime
dir c:\stuff | Select-Object Name, LastWritetime, LastAccessTime, CreationTime
ls c:\stuff | Select-Object Name, LastWritetime, LastAccessTime, CreationTime

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You can see all of the aliases for a specific CmdLet like this:
Get-Alias -Definition Get-ChildItem

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Or you can find out which command something is an alias for:
Get-Alias gci

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You'll see a lot of this type of thing, although I endeavour to avoid aliases in my examples, clarity is best :)

Now that gets you so far, you can see that we can select specific properties from the object (the directory listing in this case). If we want to access a single property we can do this:
(Get-Item "SomeFile.txt").LastWriteTime

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Or:
Get-Item "SomeFile.txt" | Select-Object -ExpandProperty LastWriteTime

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You can also access properties on objects in the pipeline:
# Filtering results
Get-ChildItem | Where-Object { $_.LastWriteTime -gt (Get-Date).AddDays(-120) }

# Looping
Get-ChildItem | ForEach-Object {
  If ($_.LastWriteTime -lt (Get-Date).AddDays(-120)) {
    Write-Host "$($_.FullName) is really old"
  } Else {
    Write-Host "$($_.FullName) was last written on $($_.LastWriteTime)"
  }
}

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In this example, $_ is the Pipeline object, it represents the current value in a loop. Where-Object is a bit of an implicit loop, it performs the comparison with a date 120 days ago for each value it gets from Get-ChildItem.

Chris
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