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Open MS Access table, add new records, and update table using System.Data.Odbc in IronPython

Posted on 2011-02-14
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I’m trying to open an MS Access table, add new records to it, and then update those added records using the System.Data.Odbc method from IronPython. I know this is possible since I was able to do this with VBScript using the createobject("adodb.recordset") method. At this point I figure instead of creating a recordset with a Client cursor to open the table I would need to use a datareader or a dataset somehow.  So I just need assistance with the proper syntax to do the same using System.Data.Odbc from IronPython.
Here is what I have so far which deletes all existing records from the “tblBooks" table, and this works perfectly.  Now what I want to do it open that same table where I can add new records to it, and then update the table with those added records.

import clr, os, sys
from os import path
clr.AddReference('System.Data')
from System.Data.Odbc import OdbcCommand, OdbcConnection

strScriptDirectory = os.path.dirname(__file__)
strComicBaseFile = strScriptDirectory + \\ComicBase.mdb
strMdbDataSource = r'Driver={Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb, *.accdb)};DBQ=' + strComicBaseFile
objConnMDBComicBase = OdbcConnection(strMdbDataSource)
objConnMDBComicBase.Open()
strSQL = "DELETE * FROM tblBooks"
objSQLCommand = OdbcCommand(strSQL, objConnMDBComicBase)
objSQLCommand.ExecuteNonQuery()

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Thank you all for any assistance that you can provide.
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Question by:oraclexview
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2 Comments
 
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Accepted Solution

by:
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 500 total points
ID: 34892850
You can use standard INSERT and UPDATE statments against Access as well, so you could just use the same basic syntax except with a valid SQL INSERT or UPDATE statement.

You can also open a Recordset, but unless you need to work with that recordset AFTER adding the new record, then there's really no reason to do this.

For example:

strSQL = "INSERT INTO tblBooks(BookName, BookAuthor) VALUES('My Pretty Pony', 'Stephen King')"

The nust build and run that Command object.
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Author Closing Comment

by:oraclexview
ID: 34900681
Thank you LSMConsulting!  That was enough to get me what I wanted!  I found it interesting that using this method of updating a MS Access database file doesn't require a separate UPDATE command.  Here is the code (so others can benefit from what I've learned) I able to produce after utilizing your comment.

[code]import clr, os, sys
from os import path
clr.AddReference('System.Data')
from System.Data.Odbc import OdbcCommand, OdbcConnection
global strScriptDirectory, strComicBaseFile, strMdbDataSource, objConnMDBComicBase, strSQL, objSQLCommand

strScriptDirectory = os.path.dirname(__file__)
strComicBaseFile = strScriptDirectory + \\ComicBase.mdb
strMdbDataSource = r'Driver={Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb, *.accdb)};DBQ=' + strComicBaseFile
objConnMDBComicBase = OdbcConnection(strMdbDataSource)
objConnMDBComicBase.Open()
strSQL = "DELETE * FROM tblBooks"
objSQLCommand = OdbcCommand(strSQL, objConnMDBComicBase)
objSQLCommand.ExecuteNonQuery()

def UpdateComicBase2(books):
      for book in books:
            if book.ComicInfoIsDirty!="false":
                  strBookId = str(book.Id)
                  strSQLcolumns = "INSERT INTO tblBooks(\"Id\""
                  strSQLvalues = ") VALUES(\'" + strBookId + "\'"
                  strBookFile = str(book.FilePath)
                  strSQLcolumns = strSQLcolumns + ", \"File\""
                  strSQLvalues = strSQLvalues + ", \'" + strBookFile + "\'"
                  if book.Publisher != "":
                        strBookPublisher = str(book.Publisher)
                        strSQLcolumns = strSQLcolumns + ", \"Publisher\""
                        strSQLvalues = strSQLvalues + ", \'" + strBookPublisher + "\'"
                  if book.Series != "":
                        strBookSeries = str(book.Series)
                        strSQLcolumns = strSQLcolumns + ", \"Series\""
                        strSQLvalues = strSQLvalues + ", \'" + strBookSeries + "\'"
                  if book.Volume != -1:
                        strBookVolume = str(book.Volume)
                        strSQLcolumns = strSQLcolumns + ", \"Volume\""
                        strSQLvalues = strSQLvalues + ", \'" + strBookVolume + "\'"
                  if book.Format != "":
                        strBookFormat = str(book.Format)
                        strSQLcolumns = strSQLcolumns + ", \"Format\""
                        strSQLvalues = strSQLvalues + ", \'" + strBookFormat + "\'"
                  if book.Number != "":
                        strBookNumber = str(book.Number)
                        strSQLcolumns = strSQLcolumns + ", \"Number\""
                        strSQLvalues = strSQLvalues + ", \'" + strBookNumber + "\'"
                  if book.Tags != "":
                        strBookTags = str(book.Tags)
                        strSQLcolumns = strSQLcolumns + ", \"Tags\""
                        strSQLvalues = strSQLvalues + ", \'" + strBookTags + "\'"
                  strSQL = strSQLcolumns + strSQLvalues + ")"
                  objSQLCommand = OdbcCommand(strSQL, objConnMDBComicBase)
                  objSQLCommand.ExecuteNonQuery()[/code]

Thanks again for the assistance and enjoy the points!
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