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kiloelectronvolt

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Adding Type 1 Postscript Fonts To Mac OS X Snow Leopard

Apparently there is no native support in Snow Leopard for installing Type 1 Postscript fonts. I have a few I'm trying to add, when I click on them Font Book launches but just sits there. Are there any workarounds, or third-party font utilities (free or paid) which will allow me to install Type 1 Postscript fonts. I read somewhere there's a method to use them if you have Adobe Illustrator or any of the Adobe Creative Suite installed by placing them into a folder within the app. Any ideas?
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strung
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I've used TransType in the past to inspect my fonts and workout which ones are causing problems.

http://www.fontlab.com/font-converter/transtype/

There is a demo version, just make sure you dont load your real fonts into this version take a copy of them in to a different folder and test from there ...
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kiloelectronvolt

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Doesn't make sense! The fonts I have received were exported from a QuarkXpress project 'collect for output' where it grabs all images, layouts and fonts ready to sent to a professional printer. This is the way the graphic designer always sends content for print. Though I doubt most of his partners have Snow Leopard yet.
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Sigurdur Armannsson
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That seemed to work. Do it manually! :)
There is complete support for Type 1 fonts with Mac OS 10.x. Unfortunately since 10.4 there have been serious issues with Helvetica and Helvetica Neue OPENTYPE fonts and the equivalent Type 1 fonts.

When using collect for project in Quark and Package for Indesign (using any Mac OS) the application will only collect what font Type font components are needed.

An example is Helvetica Heue which has in a complete set over 40 weights and styles (light, light condensed, roman, roman italic, et). For each of these fonts within a type face there will be a screen font (sed to render the font on screen) and a printer font (used to print the font).

When you designer is passing off work in this manner all of the font components ( you require) may not be collected. When you got to Typeface on your computer the font components may give the impression all the font is complete however only limited font weights and styles will be available.

This is done to comply with various copyright and laws regarding fonts and font technology.

If you need to overcome the problem your design may be willing t supply a copy of the font used in its entirity, however this would compromise the legality of the font. Your best legal action would be to buy the font used or compromise with the designer and use a typeface avaialble within the Mac OS.