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Question about ethernet hookup

Posted on 2011-02-14
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I need to adjust the cabling setup at my Dad's house. I've attached a picture from his closet where the wiring from the jacks is hooked up to connect to the router. I don't know what this board is called, but I'd like to find out if there is some kind of special tool for disconneting/reconnecting the wires. I though maybe that each block of 8 (marked by the yellow square) would disconnect and then you could move around the entire block of wires. But it doesn't appear that it detaches and it looks like you have to reconnect the individual wires.

 picture
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Question by:opike
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Richard2k4 earned 900 total points
ID: 34893586
its called a "Punch Down" tool.  small end pushes the wires in using a spring load.

in a pinch, you can use a small flat head screw drive to push them in.  when you push in the wires, the metal contacts in the plastic will cut into the wires thus completing the circuit.
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by:aleghart
aleghart earned 700 total points
ID: 34893659
No tools to move multiple wires.  You punch down each wire individually with a punchdown tool.

Pull all the existing wires off, then re-route the cable to the proper spot.  Untwist one more twist of each pair (you might have to remove a little more of the blue cable sheath.  (Use a Cat5 cable stripper, or do it very carefully with a razor or Olfa knife.)

Put the wires back to their color-coded places.  Use the cutoff blade for your punchdown tool.  Put the "cut" side to the outside, so it cuts off the excess at the same time it punches down the wire.  It might take a couple of punches to get the wire to cut cleanly.  Don't pull the excess off, as this will loosen the connection.  Most punchdown tools have an adjustable spring, or a low/high tension adjuster.
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by:kdearing
kdearing earned 400 total points
ID: 34894161
It's called a "110 block", and yes you should use a punch tool with a 110 blade.
They aren't that cheap, you can get them at Home Depot or Lowes for $40 - $80.

If this is a one-time use and you don't want to spend the money, you can use a very thin-bladed common screwdriver to push the wires into the slots.
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Author Comment

by:opike
ID: 34934510
The wires were successfully moved over. I went with a mini flathead screwdriver. Thanks for the info guys.
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