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Should I always use VARCHAR

Posted on 2011-02-15
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11

VARCHAR requires 1 bytes per character

NVARCHAR requires 2 bytes per character

Should I always use VARCHAR
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Question by:Mr_Shaw
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by:loopfinity
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by:Bardobrave
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If I'm not mistaken, varchar will reserve the whole space for your field, while nvarchar will reserve space dinamically.

So, if you have a varchar(50), it will ocupy always 50 bytes, while a nvarchar(50) will ocupy 10 bytes when you store a record with 5 chars and 20 bytes when you store a record with 10 chars.

varchar will reserve space even for empty (and maybe null, but I'm not really sure) records. So, in the long term, usually nvarchar will allow you to save space except on fields where you are very aware of the chars that is used (IDs, phones, etc...).

So, for strictly inputted data use varchar, and for free text use nvarchar.
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by:Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]
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>If I'm not mistaken, varchar will reserve the whole space for your field, while nvarchar will reserve space dinamically.
you confuse CHAR vs VARCHAR

CHAR/NCHAR will indeed reserve the space (using trailing spaces)
VARCHAR/NVARCHAR will not reserve space, but only use space as needed.

both will NOT reserve any space if NULL is to be stored.

apart from that, indeed the NCHAR and NVARCHAR will use 2 bytes per character, to allow multi-codepage data to be stored.
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John Claes earned 452 total points
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Mr_Shaw:

the answer for your question is One we can't answer.

We only can tell you the difference and you must decide then what you need/don't need.

char indeed reserves the spaces (1byte / Char)
varchar doesn't reserve the space but will use dynamicaly (1byte / Char)

the nChar and nVarchar are the MultiCode page versions of the 2 above.
For this expansion they indeed need 2 bytes for each char

So Now you need to decide do you need multiCode text to be saved in the database?
Yes : Use the N-Versions
No : Use the normal versions


regards

poor beggar
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by:wdosanjos
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VARCHAR and NVARCHAR require an extra 2 bytes to store the string size.  So a 15 character string will require 17 bytes for a VARCHAR and 32 bytes for a NVARCHAR, against 15 bytes for CHAR and 30 bytes for NCHAR.

So to save space I would recommend CHAR/NCHAR for columns that hold attributes that are truly fixed in length (like most codes) or have only 1 or 2 characters (CHAR(1), CHAR(2), NCHAR(1), NCHAR(2)).
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by:Mr_Shaw
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thanks
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