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Is this bitwise &?

Posted on 2011-02-15
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I see a line of code in a woring C# program that looks like:

control.IsVisible = control.IsVisible & true;

I am at a loss as to what this means.

Does anyone know?

Thanks,
newbieweb

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Question by:newbieweb
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8 Comments
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:loopfinity
ID: 34901740
this is binary end operator.
code taken form :http://weblogs.asp.net/alessandro/archive/2007/10/02/bitwise-operators-in-c-or-xor-and-amp-amp-not.aspx

regards.
protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
byte a = 7;
byte b = 9;
int orComputed = a & b;
Response.Write(string.Format("<br />{0} & {1} Result :{2}", a, b, orComputed));
}

Output is :
7 & 9 Result :1

Open in new window

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LVL 75

Expert Comment

by:käµfm³d 👽
ID: 34901809
Yes, a single ampersand denotes bitwise-AND.
0
 
LVL 75

Expert Comment

by:käµfm³d 👽
ID: 34901845
To go further, the expression sets the value of IsVisible to true if IsVisible is false, and false if IsVisible is true. It basically flips the value of IsVisible, which could also be accomplished via a NOT:

control.IsVisible = !control.IsVisible;
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LVL 52

Accepted Solution

by:
Carl Tawn earned 500 total points
ID: 34901901
No it doesn't. XOR would have the effect of flipping the bit, AND has the effect of setting it to its current value. So that snippet would appear to not actually do anything.
0
 

Author Comment

by:newbieweb
ID: 34902181
I also concluded the code did nothing.  Please respond now if you disagree...
0
 
LVL 75

Expert Comment

by:käµfm³d 👽
ID: 34903744
Well...   do  I feel sheepish....  on second glance (and thx to carl_tawn's dilligence) I agree, it does not flip the value. That explains why they won't let me play with the bits at work...     =  )
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LVL 52

Expert Comment

by:Carl Tawn
ID: 34904278
Is that line part of a larger block? Maybe it was intended to do something at some point, but is now redundant.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:newbieweb
ID: 34906331
I'm not sure about the rest of the code. I was asked to explain this bizarre line, and also concluded it did nothing.

Thanks.
0

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