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switch question

Posted on 2011-02-15
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
If I have a network configured like this:

Switch A 1GB -> Switch B 1GB->10/100MB

So I have 2 GB switches daisy chained to a Sonicwall router into the 10/100MB port.  Does the traffic between switch A and B run at 1GB potential speed?  Does the fact that the PC sometimes passes traffic out through the Sonicwall somehow modify TCP/IP window sizes which might reduce network efficiency?

Reason I ask is I have a client with this setup getting about 30Mbp/s transfer speeds going from pc to pc each with GB nics.
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Question by:GDavis193
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4 Comments
 
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rawinnlnx9 earned 167 total points
ID: 34902297
Technically no. Gigabit to Gigabit should be true unless you are not using gigabit cable or you have throttled your network cards. Anytime you go from a gigabit to a 10/100 your time is always 10/100 so it should only affect traffic that is going from the gigabit into the 10/100. Now you'll never get true gigabit unless you are in a vacuum but it's a nice thought.
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Assisted Solution

by:Matt V
Matt V earned 167 total points
ID: 34902323
Gbps speed rating is the max attainable under ideal circumstances.  This means NICs from the same manufacturer, switches that can actually handle the throughput (not all switches are created equal) and CAT5e or better cabling from end to end.

Also, make sure everything is set to AUTO/AUTO for duplex and speed as this is a requirement for proper Gbps setup.
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Assisted Solution

by:rfc1180
rfc1180 earned 166 total points
ID: 34902860
>So I have 2 GB switches daisy chained to a Sonicwall router into the 10/100MB port
If the PCs are in separate VLANs and use the Sonicwall as the gateway between subnets then you will be limited to the bandwidth of the Sonicwall 10/100 port. If the PCs are in the same subnet, you should theoretically see close to 450-650Mbps depending on several factors which is limited to the Ethernet frames you are using on the network (1538 Bytes). Smaller frames are less efficient, therefore require more resources; unfortunately, you are limited to 1500 bytes MTU at layer 3 and increasing the size of the frame will only cause additional issues.

Billy
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Author Closing Comment

by:GDavis193
ID: 34907103
Just needed confirmation.

Thanks.
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