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Oracle table partition and join on date question

I have a table like this:
Select * from test3 order by f0,f1,f3;
F0      F1      F2      F3
---------------------------------
A      X      7      6/10/2010
A      X      7      6/11/2010
A      X      17      6/12/2010
A      Y      10      6/11/2010
A      Y      20      6/12/2010
A      Y      20      6/13/2010

Attached the table creation script. This table is created such that the value of F2 is the cumulative (from any row before till the current row) sum of F2 with the partition of (F0, F1). How can I create an output that will take the check the last row in the (F1, F2) partition of the above table and add rows to the O/P with identical last row value but the F3 value added by 1 day in each consecutive entry till sysdate.

The O/P will look like:
A      X      7      6/10/2010
A      X      7      6/11/2010
A      X      17      6/12/2010
A      X      17      6/13/2010
A      X      17      6/14/2010
A      X      17      6/15/2010
A      X      17      6/16/2010
...................--another about 240 records
A      X      17      2/15/2011 -- sysdate
A      Y      10      6/11/2010
A      Y      20      6/12/2010
A      Y      20      6/13/2010
A      Y      20      6/14/2010
A      Y      20      6/15/2010
A      Y      20      6/16/2010
A      Y      20      6/17/2010
.......
A      Y      20      2/15/2011 --sysdate

create table test3(f0 varchar2(100), f1 varchar2(100), f2 number(10), f3 date);
insert into test3 values ('A',  'X', 7, to_date('06/10/2010', 'mm/dd/yyyy'));
insert into test3 values ('A',  'X', 7, to_date('06/12/2010', 'mm/dd/yyyy'));
insert into test3 values ('A',  'X', 17, to_date('06/11/2010', 'mm/dd/yyyy'));
insert into test3 values ('A',  'Y', 10, to_date('06/17/2010', 'mm/dd/yyyy'));
insert into test3 values ('A',  'Y', 20, to_date('06/20/2010', 'mm/dd/yyyy'));
insert into test3 values ('A',  'Y', 20, to_date('06/20/2010', 'mm/dd/yyyy'));

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toooki
Asked:
toooki
2 Solutions
 
Mark GeerlingsDatabase AdministratorCommented:
Your question title is misleading for two reasons, first because you do not have a partitioned table, and second because your query involves only a single table, you don't have a join either.

(Your table design is not normalized, because the value for F2 is derived from other rows.  That can cause other problems for you, but you aren't asking specifically about that.)

It looks like what you are asking for is a query to return more rows that what your table includes.  Simple SQL queries can only return rows that are in a table, not data that doesn't exist.  You will need another table that contains records for each day that you want included in your query results.  Then you will need an "outer join" to this second table to return rows that don't exist in your main table.

Your second table could be something like this:
create table calendar (day date);

Then you need to populate that calendar table with records for each day that you want included in your query output.

I don't have time right now to write the final query for you, but this approach should get you started.
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slightwv (䄆 Netminder) Commented:
I don't fully understand the logic.  

For example: A X 17 gets over 200 rows and A Y 10 gets one.

Anyway, below is a test showing how to get all the rows from a given date to sysdate.  Hopefully you can integrate it into your code.


drop table tab1 purge;
create table tab1(col1 char(1), col2 date);

insert into tab1 values('a',to_date('02/10/2011','MM/DD/YYYY'));
insert into tab1 values('b',to_date('02/12/2011','MM/DD/YYYY'));
commit;


select col1, col2+level myDate
from tab1
CONNECT BY LEVEL < sysdate-col2
group by col1, col2+level
order by 1,2
/

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toookiAuthor Commented:
Thank you for the help and suggestions. I am testing the code.
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