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Exchange Authoritative domains

Hello

I'm running Exchange 2007 SP2 in my company. Under remote domains we have loads of domains, and under Accepted Domains we have even more. One of the reasons is that we also relay messages to partner companies.

I want to work out which domains our Exchange system "owns", that is it is purely responsible for. Does anyone know how I can do this?
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Joe_Budden
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Joe_Budden
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2 Solutions
 
Alan HardistyCommented:
Type the following in the Exchange Management Shell:

get-accepteddomain

That should list the accepted domains and tell you if you are authoritative for them or not.
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tigermattCommented:

Accepted Domains which your Exchange system completely "owns" will be the authoritative ones.

The following command, run at Exchange Management Shell, will return a list of all the authoritative domains for you:

Get-AcceptedDomain | where {$_.DomainType -eq "Authoritative"}

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That should be the info you are looking for. Of course, you can use the usual Powershell tools to filter the output accordingly.

-Matt
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Joe_BuddenAuthor Commented:
Does this mean that only Exchange owns this domain, no one else? Or that Exchange will purely recv and can relay email for this domain?
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Alan HardistyCommented:
Yes and No!

A domain can be shared between several servers, but generally if the domain is authoritative for a domain, it is usually the only one that handles mail for that domain.

Exchange can receive and relay mail for other domains and those will be listed an Non-Authoritative.
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tigermattCommented:

An authoritative domain is one Exchange "owns" entirely. If Exchange receives an inbound message addressed to someone who doesn't exist @myauthoritativedomain.com, then Exchange will bounce the message with an NDR (or flat out terminate the SMTP session mid-flow, if you have the anti-spam agents installed and recipient filtering enabled).

So... the domains in the results of the above command are ones Exchange "owns" entirely.

-Matt
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tigermattCommented:

Alan raises an interesting point - if Exchange isn't the first point of delivery for an authoritative domain (i.e. it isn't the environment listed in the domain's public MX record), it doesn't have to be authoritative for all email to that domain. Email in that case may be delivered to another email organization which is simply forwarding it on to Exchange.

Thanks Alan :)

-Matt
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Alan HardistyCommented:
No probs - Shared SMTP Name Space is a possibility where several servers could receive the mail for a domain then pass it on to another server and then another before it finally gets pushed to the last one which has to be authoritative.

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