Solved

WXP to W7 upgarde

Posted on 2011-02-17
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
We have windows 2003 Active directory domain.
Our end users have window xp ,I am planning to upgrade from XP to windows 7.
XP desktops have applications installed, I would like to keep everything, the change will only be on OS from WXP to W7.

How can I do that?
Thanks
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Question by:jskfan
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20 Comments
 
LVL 6

Accepted Solution

by:
Kris Montgomery earned 143 total points
ID: 34921791
1. Use disk2vhd to get a copy of the XP machine in vhd form... Do a clean install of Win7 and then install MS Virtual PC and attach the XP vhd.  You can have your XP machine and a clean version of 7.   http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/ee656415

2. You can upgrade from XP to Vista and then from Vista to 7.    PLEASE do not do this! :)

3. Or use a third party app:  http://www.laplink.com/pcmover

Thanks.
mug
0
 
LVL 19

Assisted Solution

by:Rob Hutchinson
Rob Hutchinson earned 36 total points
ID: 34921792
Do not think you can, well the is no official upgrade solution offered by Micro$oft as far as I know.

Only thing they are offering is an upgrade that should not really even be called, an "upgrade":
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/help/upgrading-from-windows-xp-to-windows-7

This upgrade only let's you do a clean install.
0
 
LVL 62

Assisted Solution

by:☠ MASQ ☠
☠ MASQ ☠ earned 72 total points
ID: 34921832
Here are some deployment guides but if what you want to do is retain all your installed programs and just change the operating system from XP to Windows 7  there is no path to do this.
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LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:yelbaglf
ID: 34921840
Here's a guide for this, which uses Windows Easy Transfer.
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/help/upgrading-from-windows-xp-to-windows-7

Here is the migration guide, which uses USMT.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd446674(WS.10).aspx

You can read about USMT here:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd883247(WS.10).aspx
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee681559(WS.10).aspx

When we did this, most of our hardware was similar, which allowed us to use a FOG Server with ease.  So we used USMT to gather data, created the image, pushed it out to machines, and then used USMT to apply the data.  We also chose to do this one department at a time, so that it was easier for us to manage, not only the deployment, but the 'How-To' calls.

Another option would be to use something like Microsoft's WAIK.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd349343(WS.10).aspx

You cannot upgrade from XP to Win 7.  The best you can do is the above, unless you do something like XP to Vista to 7, which is NOT RECOMMENDED and sure to be more of a headache initially and down the road.
0
 
LVL 34

Assisted Solution

by:jamietoner
jamietoner earned 72 total points
ID: 34921844
If you want to move programs you will have to buy a program call PCmover. You could use windows easy transfer(free) for files and setting but it won't move programs. Evem with PCMover there a a few programs that may not work on 7(especially if you go 64-bit).
http://www.laplink.com/pcmover
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/features/windows-easy-transfer
0
 
LVL 34

Assisted Solution

by:jamietoner
jamietoner earned 72 total points
ID: 34921854
Looks like i need to type faster. ;)
0
 
LVL 62

Assisted Solution

by:☠ MASQ ☠
☠ MASQ ☠ earned 72 total points
ID: 34921865
You're not the only one :)
0
 
LVL 6

Assisted Solution

by:Kris Montgomery
Kris Montgomery earned 143 total points
ID: 34921869
A round of points for everyone!  We all basically said the same thing!  :)

mug
0
 

Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 34924051
what about creating windows 7 template PCs, with needed applications then image them and deploy the image to other PCs?
0
 

Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 34924073

what s the fastest way to deploy the image? I know the traditional GHOST method, but it s very slow..
I have heard that Zenworks has a method of putting an image on the Zenworks server, and when the bare metal computers boot up they connect to Zenworks server and download the image and install the OS. I don't know about the details though and what are the pros and cons
0
 
LVL 11

Assisted Solution

by:yelbaglf
yelbaglf earned 71 total points
ID: 34924863
We used a FOG Server for this.  It's free, fast, and there are lots of docs out there on how to set it up.  You have options of setting the PC's up to find the FOG Server, with PXE, or you can boot to CD or USB in order to find the FOG Server.  And with the hardware specs (just a Dell XPS desktop) we had for our FOG Server, we were able to image about 10 machines at once, in less than 10 minutes.

Pretty awesome for a free piece of software! :-)

http://www.fogproject.org/
http://www.fogproject.org/wiki/index.php?title=FOGUserGuide
0
 
LVL 6

Assisted Solution

by:Kris Montgomery
Kris Montgomery earned 143 total points
ID: 34928226
We used Fog, but abandoned it after a couple months...  It is just so easy to set up and use Windows Deployment Service WDS.  So that is what we went with.  I created a nifty WinPE disk with imageX that we use to deploy images on off-network computers... otherwise the internal computers just connect using PXE.  
Easy breezy.

Thanks.
mug
0
 
LVL 6

Assisted Solution

by:Kris Montgomery
Kris Montgomery earned 143 total points
ID: 34928245
I want to add that I have nothing against FOG at all.  We already have Windows Servers at our location and didn't want to add another Linux box or virtual at each location.  

I didn't want anyone to think I was badmouthing FOG... we just went a different direction.

Thanks.
mug
0
 
LVL 11

Assisted Solution

by:yelbaglf
yelbaglf earned 71 total points
ID: 34929271
I agree muganthony...  

More times than not, it comes down to preference, and what makes sense for your environment.  WDS is also a very viable solution, and it should definitely be considered, when exploring what will work best for you and your environment.
0
 

Assisted Solution

by:exsto
exsto earned 35 total points
ID: 34940924
In the Windows 2003 Active Directory domain, assuming that you have a file share of some kind that all end users can access, I would suggest you take a look at the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010. This is a collection of scripts and softwares that can be utilized to carry through some of the below steps:

•      Install a prestaged Operating System (OS) image to a brand new computer
•      Install a prestaged OS image to a running system by running a REFRESH install
•      Install a bare OS image and automatically add any software that has been preconfigured to be added in the install process

It sounds as if you would like to do a plain upgrade from XP to Windows 7. That scenario is something which is not supported by Microsoft and instead they have created the REFRESH alternative. Ultimately, what the REFRESH does is the following:

1.      Starts a guide inside the old Windows install, letting the user choose a different number of options for the install, depending on the choices made by the administrator.
2.      Storing the user profile including application setting for not all but the most common software applications out there onto a “hard link” on the hard drive,  or onto a network share. The network share is to be user mainly if switching from one computer to another whilst the “hard link” alternative is for doing a REFRESH on the same hardware.
3.      Rebooting the system into Windows Preboot Environment (PE).
4.      Empties hard drive, except for the user settings that were previously saved.
5.      Installs the prestaged or bare image of the new OS onto the emptied hard drive.
6.      Installs any selected applications that have been chosen for install in the guide in step 1.
7.      Installs (optional) any Microsoft Security updates that have been released after the creation of the image being deployed.
8.      Reloads the user profiles onto the system from the “hard link” or from the network share alternatively.

If all your desktops are pretty much or exactly the same hardware, all drivers can be preloaded into the prestaged image. Else, the MDT2010 can be used to add the appropriate drivers ad hoc, depending on the target system.

You will find the MDT2010 here: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyId=3BD8561F-77AC-4400-A0C1-FE871C461A89&displaylang=en

I hope that this has given you a good view of what the MDT2010 is capable of doing as well as whether it would suite your needs or not.
0
 

Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 34941126
exsto: this is well explained.
But as you know in most of the upgrades it is not desirable to involve end users, it woudl be better to do it seamlessly.

windows has WDS as well as App-V.
I don't know if anyone out there has tried these options?



0
 
LVL 2

Assisted Solution

by:smoke187
smoke187 earned 71 total points
ID: 34943530
jskfan - You would use AppV for deploying applications and I have used it at our offices and have set it up at numerous places.

I have tend to use AppV in situations where a client would need to install applications that use various versions of Java, so I would sequence the application with its specific javaand then deploy them down to the end user. Also we would use it in a sceniro where an application is constantly updated so instead of carrying out the installation x times we would just carry out the update within the sequenced environment and then deploy it to the user base.

Can I ask how big your user base is for your Windows 7 deployment? as MDT 2010 is pretty straight forward and the most important part its FREE so your saving your manager some money from the get go, you would be able to get MDT to deploy the Windows 7 image to all brand/model systems in your environment (driver injection), you can also patch your image up with the latest updates and add applications to the base image then use MDT to push applications at deployment time. The biggest factor with MDT is if you have or in the future decide to use SCCM you can intrergate MDT into it which will give you zero touch deployment.

Enough of me sounding like a MS fan boy lol hope this bit of info helps, there is a varitety of methods you can use that the rest of the guys have suggested it all boils down to  how much many you can spend and what you feel comfortable implementing.
0
 

Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 34950429
Does  MDT do the same thing as WDS.?
They are both Microsoft. where do they differe?
0
 
LVL 2

Assisted Solution

by:smoke187
smoke187 earned 71 total points
ID: 34951574
In essence they do both do the same thing, WDS is found on server 2008 and has the ability to set mulicasting so you can deploy to numerous computers without adding lag to your network or to systems that may reside on slower links.

MDT can be installed on various platform, it makes sense to set it up on a server but I have seen it running on a Windows 7!

Personally you may find MDT easier and I have not really toyed with WDS to be honest. I have found MDT to be quite straight forward but with both deployment methods there is plenty of material to guide you through the setups.

Its probably best you have a read on both the deployment methods and even try them out to see which one meets your setup and which one your comfortable using. You can always come back on here and ask questions on either deployment mechanism as  there is enough of us here to assist.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 34960000
thanks guys
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