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ulimit -a ; what does the last column mean?

Posted on 2011-02-18
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In the output of `unlimit -a', what does the last column mean?


From a solaris box:

bash-3.00$ ulimit -a
core file size        (blocks, -c) unlimited
data seg size         (kbytes, -d) unlimited
file size             (blocks, -f) unlimited
open files                    (-n) 4096
pipe size          (512 bytes, -p) 10
stack size            (kbytes, -s) 8192
cpu time             (seconds, -t) unlimited
max user processes            (-u) 29995
virtual memory        (kbytes, -v) unlimited

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Question by:modsiw
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woolmilkporc earned 500 total points
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The last column is the limit!

The first column shows the item which is "limited" (or not), the second shows the unit of measure the limit is expressed in, and the last column - well, that's the actual limit.

See "man limits.conf" and "man ulimit" for more

wmp
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by:modsiw
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I just looked at this again. I was only concerned with pipesize, so I only really looked at its line and assumed that 512 bytes was the limit.

Talk about tunnel vision.

Thanks.
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